William Abler

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William L. Abler or simply known as Bill Abler is a paleontologist who has mostly studied the teeth of dinosaurs. He has studied tyrannosaurine teeth and has come up with the conclusion that Tyrannosaurus had infectious saliva that could have helped it kill prey. In modern animals this saliva can be seen in many monitor lizards, such as Varanus komodoensis, commonly known as the Komodo dragon or Komodo Monitor.

He has written papers and books on paleontology, one of them is The Teeth of the Tyrannosaurs.[1] He has written a book too, on the human being's place in nature, called Structure of Matter, Structure of Mind: Man's Place in Nature, Reconsidered.[2]

References and Sources[edit]

  1. ^ Scientific American Digital - The Teeth of the Tyrannosaurs September 1999; Scientific American Magazine; by William Abler; 2 Pages
  2. ^ Structure of Matter, Structure of Mind: Man's Place in Nature, Reconsidered- Pensoft Notes