Young professional

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For other uses of "Young professional", see Young professional (disambiguation).

The term young professional generally refers to a young person not in school who is employed in a profession or white-collar occupation. The meaning may be ambiguous[1] and has evolved from its original narrow meaning of a young person in a professional field.[2] Although derivative of the term 'yuppie', it has grown into its own set of meanings.

Traits[edit]

The term was originally, and is still used to some degree, to narrowly refer to recent graduates of professional schools serving in professional careers.[2][3]

Stereotypically, they can also be viewed as having an "obsession with success" and "plagued with loneliness."[4] Alternatively, young professionals can be seen as highly spiritual and "seeking a spiritual outlet to balance their hectic working lives."[5]

Young professionals are viewed as being strongly attached to technology and media[6] and are targeted by makers of those products.[7]

Impact and connections with larger entities[edit]

Young professionals can provide a welcome increase in a local area's tax base and can also create a snowball effect of attracting and infusing young energy and talent into an area.[8] Young professionals can also organize themselves and bring energy to shape communities and alter local or ethnic politics.[9]

Young professionals are courted by larger social and occupational organizations or employers in some contexts,[10][11] but not in others.[6]

Young professionals are also heavily targeted by purveyors of career and financial advice.[12][13]

In the workplace, young professionals can be viewed as talented and energetic individuals who present special management challenges[14] or as "cannon fodder" to be cast aside once they are no longer profitable to a business.[3]

As euphemism for "single"[edit]

Main article: singles event

The stigma that developed in the 1970s around singles functions and singles groups led some organizations to switch the name of their singles events to "young professionals events".[15][16][17] However, other organizations specifically for young professionals insist that they are not "singles groups".[18]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "I am not sure what "young professionals" means..." After the storm: American society a decade after the Vietnam War : proceedings of the International Conference on "The U.S.A.: A Decade After the Vietnam War", 1987, p. 33
  2. ^ a b Arun Arora and Andrew Francis, The rule of lawyers in Modernising Britain, Fabian Discussion Papers, iss. 42, 1998, p. 4
  3. ^ a b John Taylor, 'Down With M.B.A.'s' , New York magazine, November 2, 1987, p. 36
  4. ^ Max Lucado, The applause of heaven, 1996, p. 120
  5. ^ Engaging Generation Aleph: A Resource for Young Adults in the Synagogue, Union of American Hebrew Congregations, ed., 1997, p. 3
  6. ^ a b Ryan Kohnen, Young Professional's Guide to Success, 2009, pp. 1, 103
  7. ^ "Jeffrey Evans, creator of TigerText, hopes the app will attract young professionals who already use texting as their main mode of communication." Veronica Belmont, The Tangled Dating Web: TigerText, CheaterRegistry, and other digital means to aid or shame cheaters, Slate.com, March 18, 2010
  8. ^ Neighborhood organizing: nurturing strong, unified voices, charles Stewart Mott Foundation, ed., 2007, p. 8
  9. ^ Glenn Omatsu, "Four Prisons" and the Movements of Liberation, in Asian American studies: a reader, Jean Yu-wen Shen Wu and Min Song, eds., 2000, p. 178
  10. ^ Aart J. M. Van De Laar, The World Bank and the poor, in Series on the Development of Societies, Institute of Social Studies, ed., vol. 6, p. 101
  11. ^ Government Executive, vol. 26, 1994, pp. 16, 18
  12. ^ Lisa C. Jones, Money Management for Young Professionals, Ebony, October 1992, p. 128
  13. ^ Tanner Strasky, Find Your Inner Ugly Betty: 25 Career Lessons for Young Professionals Inspired by TV Shows, 2008
  14. ^ Roger B. Winston, Don G. Creamer, and Theodore K. Miller, The professional student affairs administrator: educator, leader, and manager, 2001, p. 394
  15. ^ Bernard Berk, Face-Saving at the Singles Dance, Social Problems, vol. 24, 1976, pp. 500, 532
  16. ^ Stephen Fried, The new rabbi: a congregation searches for its leader, 2002, p. 57
  17. ^ Engaging Generation Aleph: A Resource for Young Adults in the Synagogue, Union of American Hebrew Congregations, ed., 1997, p. 81
  18. ^ Engaging Generation Aleph: A Resource for Young Adults in the Synagogue, Union of American Hebrew Congregations, ed., 1997, p. 96