État 141-001 to 141-250

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État 141-001 to 141-250
SNCF 3-141.B → C
141-C-100-a.jpg
141.C.100 on the Train à Vapeur de Touraine heritage railway, 28 August 1983.
Specifications
Power type Steam
Builder Schneider et Cie. (190)
SACM (60)
Build date 1921–1923
Total produced 250
Configuration 2-8-2
UIC classification 1′D1′ h2
Gauge 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in)
Leading wheel
diameter
850 mm (33.46 in)
Driver diameter 1,650 mm (64.96 in)
Trailing wheel
diameter
1,250 mm (49.21 in)
Length 13 m (42 ft 8 in)
Weight on drivers 67.8 t
Locomotive weight 87.0 tonnes (85.6 long tons; 95.9 short tons)
Tender weight 54.6 tonnes (53.7 long tons; 60.2 short tons)
Fuel type Coal
Fuel capacity 9 or 12 tonnes
Water capacity 22,000 litres (4,800 imp gal; 5,800 US gal)
Tender capacity 7.0 tonnes (6.9 long tons; 7.7 short tons)
Boiler pressure 12 kg/cm2 (1.18 MPa; 171 psi), later 14 kg/cm2 (1.37 MPa; 199 psi)
Firegrate area 3.87 m2 (41.7 sq ft)
Heating surface:
– Total
207.37 m2 (2,232.1 sq ft)
Superheater area 46.35 m2 (498.9 sq ft)
Cylinders Two, outside
Cylinder size 630 mm × 700 mm (24.80 in × 27.56 in)
Top speed 100 km/h (62 mph)
Power output 1,700 hp (1,268 kW)
Career
Operator(s) Chemins de Fer de l'ÉtatSNCF
Class SNCF: 3-141.C
Number(s) État: 141-001 to 141-250
SNCF: 140.B.1 to 140.B.250
later 140.C.1 to 140.C.250
Preserved One: 141.C.100

État 141-001 to 141-250, was a series of 2-8-2 steam locomotives of the Chemins de Fer de l'État.

Overview[edit]

The series of 250 engines, numbered 141-001 to 141-250 were built in 1921. They were renumbered 141.B.001 to 141.B.250 by the SNCF in 1938 and ended their career in the West of France at the end of the 1960s.

Table of orders
Year Manufacturer Serial nos. État nos. SNCF nos. Notes
1920 Schneider et Cie. 3630–3739 141-001 – 141-110 3-141.B.1 – 110
1921–1922 Schneider et Cie. 3740–3819 141-111 – 141-190 3-141.B.111 – 110
1923 SACM (Graffenstaden) 7232–7291 141-191 – 141-250 3-141.B.191 – 250

Design[edit]

The engines were capable of a speed of up 100 km/h. Their light weight per axle made them capable of hauling both passenger and goods trains on most of the Chemins de Fer de l'État’s network and of the former Chemins de Fer de l'Ouest. Due to the need of a simple to operate and solid locomotive, the Chemins de Fer de l'État even went to choose the pressure of the boiler (or timbre in French). The pressure was 12 kp/cm² or 12 hectopièzes (old units of measurement, 1.2 MPa in modern units), this enabled to machine to develop an output of 1,540 hp (1,150 kW) at 60 km/h and 830 hp (620 kW) at 100 km/h. From 1932 the timbre was increased to 14 kp/m² to obtain a power of 1,700 hp (1,300 kW) at 60 km/h and 1,160 hp (870 kW) at 100 km/h; locomotives were recoded from "B" to "C" as this work was done.

141.C.50 was rebuilt at Sotteville-lès-Rouen in 1928. This depot was built by the British and was the largest of the Chemins de Fer de l'Ouest (part of the État from 1908). There it received new Renaud type valves, saving 9.8% coal. It also received a Kylchap exhaust.

Preservation[edit]

One locomotive has been preserved: 141.C.100 (and tender 22.B.609) are in working order and are listed as a Monument historique.

References[edit]

  • Davies, John (August 2001). Chemins de fer de l'État Locomotive List 1878–1938. Woodbridge, Queensland: Dr. John Davies. pp. 101–105. ISBN 0-7316-8442-7.