(434326) 2004 JG6

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2004 JG6
Discovery
Discovered by Brian A. Skiff / LONEOS
Discovery date 11 May 2004
Designations
none
Aten, Apohele
Mercury-crosser
Venus-crosser
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 1
Observation arc 4035 days (11.05 yr)
Aphelion 0.97260 AU (145.499 Gm)
Perihelion 0.29783 AU (44.555 Gm)
0.63521 AU (95.026 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.53114
0.51 yr (184.9 d)
34.58 km/s
227.457°
1.9468°/day
Inclination 18.946°
37.038°
352.980°
Earth MOID 0.0398511 AU (5.96164 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 4.46699 AU (668.252 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 8.752
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 0.5–1.1 km[2]
Mass 1.3–18.0×1011 kg
Mean density
2.0? g/cm³
Equatorial surface gravity
0.0001–0.0003 m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
0.0003–0.0006 km/s
? d
0.10?
Temperature ~349 K
?
18.4

(434326) 2004 JG6 (also written 2004 JG6) is one of the closest orbiting objects to the Sun.

It is the second known Apohele asteroid (the first being 163693 Atira), which means its entire orbit lies within that of the Earth.[1] Its orbital period is less than that of Venus, making it one of the closest known objects to the Sun, after Mercury. 2004 JG6 has an eccentric orbit that crosses the orbits of both Mercury and Venus.[1]

It was discovered by Brian A. Skiff of the LONEOS project.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2004 JG6)" (2012-06-10 last obs (arc=8 years)). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 8 April 2016. 
  2. ^ NEODyS

External links[edit]