(343158) 2009 HC82

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(343158) 2009 HC82
Discovery[1]
Discovered by A. Boattini,
E. C. Beshore,
G. J. Garradd,
A. D. Grauer,
R. E. Hill,
R. A. Kowalski,
S. M. Larson,
R. H. McNaught
Catalina Sky Survey (703)
Discovery date 29 April 2009
Designations
MPC designation (343158) 2009 HC82
Apollo, NEO,[2]
Retrograde
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 1
Observation arc 4394 days (12.03 yr)
Aphelion 4.5665 AU (683.14 Gm) (Q)
Perihelion 0.48904 AU (73.159 Gm) (q)
2.5278 AU (378.15 Gm) (a)
Eccentricity 0.80653 (e)
4.02 yr (1467.9 d)
284.23° (M)
0° 14m 42.864s / day (n)
Inclination 154.40° (i)
295.20° (Ω)
298.71° (ω)
Earth MOID 0.146217 AU (21.8738 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.91679 AU (286.748 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 1.315
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 1.6–3.6 km[2][3]
~20[1]
16.2[2]

(343158) 2009 HC82, also written as (343158) 2009 HC82 is an Apollo near-Earth asteroid,[2] initially listed as a potentially hazardous object.[1] It was removed from the Sentry Risk Table on 6 May 2009.[4] It has a retrograde orbit and makes many close approaches to Earth, Venus, and Mars at a very high relative velocity.

Velocity[edit]

(343158) 2009 HC82 has a retrograde orbit and thus orbits the Sun in the opposite direction of other objects. Therefore, close approaches to this object can have very high relative velocities. As of 2012, it had the highest relative velocity to Earth of objects that come within 0.5 AU of Earth.[5] On 11 November 2024, 2009 HC82 will pass about 0.485 AU (72,600,000 km; 45,100,000 mi) from Earth, but with a record high relative velocity of about 283,000 km/h (78.66 km/s).[6] Both Halley's Comet (254,000 km/h)[7] and 55P/Tempel-Tuttle (252,800 km/h)[8] have slightly lower relative velocities to Earth. Note however that when the asteroid is one astronomical unit from the sun (as it would be if it ever hit the earth), its relative speed will be less.

On 2 February 2053, (343158) 2009 HC82 will pass about 0.08 AU from Venus.[6] On 22 October 2060, it may pass about 0.004 AU (600,000 km; 370,000 mi) from Mars.[6]

The multiple planet crossing and retrograde orbit suggests that this object may be an extinct comet or damocloid asteroid similar to 5335 Damocles, 2008 KV42, and 20461 Dioretsa.[9]

Since the true albedo is unknown and it has an absolute magnitude (H) of 16.1,[2] it is about 1.6 to 3.6 km in diameter.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "MPEC 2009-J04 : 2009 HC82". IAU Minor Planet Center. 2009-05-01. Retrieved 2011-02-08. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2009 HC82)" (last observation: 2010-04-04). Retrieved 8 April 2016. 
  3. ^ a b "Absolute Magnitude (H)". NASA/JPL. Archived from the original on 26 November 2009. Retrieved 2009-12-06. 
  4. ^ "Date/Time Removed". NASA/JPL Near-Earth Object Program Office. Retrieved 2012-03-19. 
  5. ^ "NEO Close-Approaches (Between 1900 and 2200)". NASA/JPL Near-Earth Object Program. Retrieved 2012-06-22.  (sorted by descending relative velocity, dist<0.5AU = "215,221 close-Earth approaches")
  6. ^ a b c "JPL Close-Approach Data: (2009 HC82)" (last observation: 2010-04-04). Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  7. ^ "JPL Close-Approach Data: 1P/Halley" (last observation: 1994-01-11). Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  8. ^ "JPL Close-Approach Data: 55P/Tempel-Tuttle" (last observation: 1998-07-05). Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  9. ^ Akimasa Nakamura and bas (2009-05-02). "List of Damocloids (Oort cloud asteroids)". Lowell Observatory. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 

External links[edit]