861 Aïda

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
861 Aïda
Discovery [1]
Discovered by M. Wolf
Discovery site Heidelberg Obs.
Discovery date 22 January 1917
Designations
MPC designation 861 Aida
Named after
Aida (Italian opera)[2]
1917 BE · 1939 BL
1947 OF · 1950 BW1
A906 BG · A918 GA
main-belt · (outer)[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 110.14 yr (40228 days)
Aphelion 3.4606 AU (517.70 Gm)
Perihelion 2.8163 AU (421.31 Gm)
3.1385 AU (469.51 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.10264
5.56 yr (2030.8 d)
124.76°
0° 10m 38.172s / day
Inclination 8.0498°
115.03°
193.81°
Earth MOID 1.80186 AU (269.554 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.76618 AU (264.217 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.188
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 66.85±3.7 km (IRAS:39)[4]
69.61±1.13 km[5]
66.78 km (derived)[3]
Mean radius
33.425±1.85 km
10.95±0.03 h,[6] 10.95 h (0.456 d)[1]
0.0571±0.007 (IRAS:39)[1][4]
0.053±0.002[5]
0.0522 (derived)[3]
C[3]
9.7[1]

861 Aïda, provisional designation 1917 BE, is a carbonaceous asteroid from the outer region of the asteroid belt, about 67 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 22 January 1917, by German astronomer Max Wolf at Heidelberg Observatory in southern Germany.[7]

The dark C-type asteroid orbits the Sun at a distance of 2.8–3.5 AU once every 5 years and 7 months (2,032 days). Its orbit is tilted by 8 degrees to the plane of the ecliptic and shows an eccentricity of 0.10. It has a provisional rotation period of 10.95 hours[6] and an albedo around 0.055, according to the surveys carried out by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite, IRAS, and the Japanese Akari satellite, as well as based on derived calculations by the Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link.[3][4][5]

The minor planet was named for Aida, the famous opera in four acts by the Italian composer Giuseppe Verdi (1813–1901), after whom the minor planet 3975 Verdi is named.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 861 Aida (1917 BE)" (2015-11-20 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 4 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (861) Aïda. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 78. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 3 January 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c d e "LCDB Data for (861) Aida". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 3 January 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c Tedesco, E. F.; Noah, P. V.; Noah, M.; Price, S. D. (October 2004). "IRAS Minor Planet Survey V6.0". NASA Planetary Data System. Bibcode:2004PDSS...12.....T. Retrieved 3 January 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan. 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved 3 January 2016. 
  6. ^ a b Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (861) Aida". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved 3 January 2016. 
  7. ^ "861 Aida (1917 BE)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 3 January 2016. 

External links[edit]