Sinharaja Forest Reserve: Difference between revisions

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The hilly virgin rainforest was saved from the worst of commercial logging by its inaccessibility, and was designated a World Biosphere Reserve in 1978 and a World Heritage Site in 1889. The reserve's name translates as ''Lion King''.
 
The hilly virgin rainforest was saved from the worst of commercial logging by its inaccessibility, and was designated a World Biosphere Reserve in 1978 and a World Heritage Site in 1889. The reserve's name translates as ''Lion King''.
   
The reserve is only 21km from east to west, and a maximum of 7km from north to south, but it is a treasure-trove of [[endemic species]], including trees, insects, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals.
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The reserve is only 21km from east to west, and a maximum of 7km from north to south, but it is a treasure-trove of [[endemic species]], including trees, insects, [[Amphibia|amphibians]], reptiles, birds and mammals.
   
 
Because of the dense vegetation, wildlife is not as easily seen as at dry zone national parks like [[Yala National Park|Yala]]. There are no [[elephant]]s, and the 15 or so [[leopard]]s are rarely seen. The commonest larger mammal is the endemic [[Purple-faced Langur]].
 
Because of the dense vegetation, wildlife is not as easily seen as at dry zone national parks like [[Yala National Park|Yala]]. There are no [[elephant]]s, and the 15 or so [[leopard]]s are rarely seen. The commonest larger mammal is the endemic [[Purple-faced Langur]].
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An interesting phenomenon is that [[bird]]s tend to move in mixed feeding flocks, invariably led by the fearless [[Greater Racket-tailed Drongo]] and the noisy [[Orange-billed Babbler]]. Of Sri Lanka's 26 endemic birds, the 20 rainforest species all occur here, including the elusive [[Red-faced Malkoha]], [[Green-billed Coucal]] and [[Sri Lanka Blue Magpie]]
 
An interesting phenomenon is that [[bird]]s tend to move in mixed feeding flocks, invariably led by the fearless [[Greater Racket-tailed Drongo]] and the noisy [[Orange-billed Babbler]]. Of Sri Lanka's 26 endemic birds, the 20 rainforest species all occur here, including the elusive [[Red-faced Malkoha]], [[Green-billed Coucal]] and [[Sri Lanka Blue Magpie]]
   
Reptiles include the endemic [[Green Pit Viper]] and [[Hump-nosed Viper]]s, and there are a large variety of [[amphibian]]s, especially [[tree frog]]s.
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Reptiles include the endemic [[Green Pit Viper]] and [[Hump-nosed Viper]]s, and there are a large variety of amphibians, especially [[tree frog]]s.
   
 
Invertebrates include the endemic [[Common Birdwing]] [[butterfly]], and the inevitable leeches.
 
Invertebrates include the endemic [[Common Birdwing]] [[butterfly]], and the inevitable leeches.

Revision as of 06:09, 30 December 2004

Sinharaja Forest Reserve is a national park in Sri Lanka. It is of international significance and has been designated a World Biosphere Reserve and World Heritage Site by UNESCO.

View from the Blue Magpie Lodge

The hilly virgin rainforest was saved from the worst of commercial logging by its inaccessibility, and was designated a World Biosphere Reserve in 1978 and a World Heritage Site in 1889. The reserve's name translates as Lion King.

The reserve is only 21km from east to west, and a maximum of 7km from north to south, but it is a treasure-trove of endemic species, including trees, insects, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals.

Because of the dense vegetation, wildlife is not as easily seen as at dry zone national parks like Yala. There are no elephants, and the 15 or so leopards are rarely seen. The commonest larger mammal is the endemic Purple-faced Langur.

Rainforest vegetation

An interesting phenomenon is that birds tend to move in mixed feeding flocks, invariably led by the fearless Greater Racket-tailed Drongo and the noisy Orange-billed Babbler. Of Sri Lanka's 26 endemic birds, the 20 rainforest species all occur here, including the elusive Red-faced Malkoha, Green-billed Coucal and Sri Lanka Blue Magpie

Reptiles include the endemic Green Pit Viper and Hump-nosed Vipers, and there are a large variety of amphibians, especially tree frogs.

Invertebrates include the endemic Common Birdwing butterfly, and the inevitable leeches.

Common Birdwing