aiScaler

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aiScaler Ltd
Limited company
Industry Application Delivery Controller
Founded 2008
Headquarters Dublin, Ireland
Key people
Jonathon Erington, Mericot Jennings
Products Proxy Server, HTTP accelerator, Web cache, DDoS mitigation
Slogan Scaling websites made simple
Website aiscaler.com

aiScaler Ltd. is a multinational software company founded in 2008. It develops application delivery controllers designed to allow dynamic web pages to scale content by intelligently caching frequently requested content. A number of websites in the Alexa top 1000 use aiScaler to manage their traffic.[1][2]

aiScaler software can be deployed either on public cloud computing platforms such as Amazon Web Services[3] or private virtual environments. aiScaler software is considered an edge device as it proxies traffic, augmenting or replacing content delivery networks endpoints.[4]

History[edit]

aiScaler started as a project in 1994 by the web development company WBS. The project was called "Jxel", short for Java Accelerator. The technology was Java-based and intended to be run on a Java Virtual Machine sharing the same computer system as the HTTP server. It was re-written in 2009 using the C computer language, occupying its own dedicated server. The new software was rewritten to run on Linux only, taking advantage of changes in the input/output model based on epoll. In July 2008, aiScaler Ltd acquired all technology of WBS for $3.8 million, allowing it to focus on selling web acceleration products.[5]

Until 2013, aiScaler was known as "aiCache", producing a product called aiScaler. The company took over the name of its main product, phasing out the brand name aiCache.[6]

Products[edit]

All aiScaler products can be categorized as Application Delivery Controllers

aiScaler is based on epoll technology allowing it to employ a right-threaded (only the specified number of workers process requests, no matter how many clients are connected), non-blocking, multiplexed IO design.[10]

References[edit]

External links[edit]