Ancaeus of Arcadia

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In Greek mythology, Ancaeus (/ænˈsəs/; Ancient Greek: Ἀγκαῖος Ankaîos) was both an Argonaut and a participant in the Calydonian Boar hunt, in which he met his end.

Family[edit]

Ancaeus was the son of King Lycurgus[1] of Arcadia either by Cleophyle or Eurynome[2] or Antinoe.[3] Ancaeus married Iotis and became the father of Agapenor who led the Arcadian forces during the Trojan War.[4]

Mythology[edit]

Ancaeus' arms were ominously hidden at home, but he set forth, dressed in a bearskin and armed only with a labrys (λάβρυς "doubled-bladed axe").[5]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae 248
  2. ^ Pausanias, 8.4.10 & 8.5.2
  3. ^ Scholia on Apollonius Rhodius, 1.164: Lycurgus' wife is otherwise known as Cleophyle or Eurynome.
  4. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae 97
  5. ^ Apollodorus, 1.8.2, 1.9.16, 3.9.2 & 3.10.7–8

References[edit]

  • Apollodorus, The Library with an English Translation by Sir James George Frazer, F.B.A., F.R.S. in 2 Volumes, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1921. ISBN 0-674-99135-4. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available from the same website.
  • Pausanias, Description of Greece with an English Translation by W.H.S. Jones, Litt.D., and H.A. Ormerod, M.A., in 4 Volumes. Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1918. ISBN 0-674-99328-4. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library
  • Pausanias, Graeciae Descriptio. 3 vols. Leipzig, Teubner. 1903. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.