Draanjik River

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Draanjik River
Black River, Alaska.jpg
Aerial view of the Draanjik River
Country United States
State Alaska
Census Area Yukon–Koyukuk
Source
 - elevation 2,356 ft (718 m) [1]
 - coordinates 65°33′33″N 141°51′19″W / 65.55917°N 141.85528°W / 65.55917; -141.85528 [2]
Mouth Black River Slough, Porcupine River [2]
 - location 16 miles (26 km) northeast of Fort Yukon, Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge
 - elevation 440 ft (134 m) [2]
 - coordinates 66°39′51″N 144°43′40″W / 66.66417°N 144.72778°W / 66.66417; -144.72778Coordinates: 66°39′51″N 144°43′40″W / 66.66417°N 144.72778°W / 66.66417; -144.72778 [2]
Length 160 mi (257 km) [2]
Draanjik River is located in Alaska
Draanjik River
Location of the mouth of the Black River in Alaska

The Draanjik or Black River is a river in eastern Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, United States. It flows generally northwest 160 miles (260 km) from its source to its mouth on the Black River Slough of the Porcupine River near the city of Fort Yukon.[2] In January 2014, the Alaska Historical Commission voted to rename the river to Draanjik, its Gwich'in name, a decision which later found approval by the Board of Geographic Names.[3][4]

The local Gwich'in name for the river is "Draanjik,"[pronunciation?] which translates as "Caches Along The River." The river gives its name to the Draanjik Gwich'in of Chalkyitsik.

The river has borne several other names: Big Black River (in order to distinguish it from similarly named streams), Orange Creek, Salmon Fork, Salmon River, Squirrel Creek, and Squirrel River. The Board on Geographic Names officially ruled in favor of "Black River" in 1959.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Derived by entering source coordinates in Google Earth.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g "Black River". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. January 1, 2000. Retrieved November 3, 2013. 
  3. ^ Alaska State Parks, Heritage newsletter, January 2014
  4. ^ http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/09/150901-renaming-mountains-denali-rainier-helens-harney-devils-tower/