Bonino De Boninis

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Bonino De Boninis
Born 1454
Lastovo, Republic of Ragusa (modern Croatia)
Died 1528
Treviso
Nationality Ragusan
Other names Dobrić Dobrićević, Dobruško Dobrojević
Occupation printer

Bonino De' Boninis (also known as Dobrić Dobrićević) one of the pioneers of printing in Europe, was born in 1454 on the small Adriatic Island of Lastovo in the Republic of Ragusa (modern Croatia).

Dobrić began to print books in 1478 when he joined Andrija Paltašić.[1] He printed in Venice,[2] Verona, Brescia and Lyon. His printed works included those of the ancient classics Tibullus, Catullus, Propertius, Virgil, Plutarch, Aulus Gellius, Aesop and Dante Alighieri's Divine Comedy. He was married to Drakula.[3]

His works were considered among the best examples of printing in his epoch. His bilingual (Latin - Italian) editions of "Aesopus moralisatus, Dante's Cantica and Divine Comedy were printed first in Brescia in 1487,[4] and then also in Lyon, France. We know of about 50 of his editions, the greatest number belonging to the period of 1483-1491 that he spent in Brescia - about 40. Croatia is in possession of 19 of his editions in 30 copies. The greatest number of his editions is in possession of the British Museum, London.

In 1512 De Boninis printed richly decorated Prayer Book in Cyrillic script, only survived copy is kept in the National Library of Paris.[5][6]

De Boninis died in Treviso in 1528.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bešić 1970, p. 274

    Которанин Андрија Јаковљев Палташић јавља се у Млецимамеђу првим штампарима око 1470. год. Уз н>ега је почео рад и Ласховљанин Добрић Добрићевић (Вопшо с!е Вопиш) као сарадник на издању Лактанцијевих дјела 1478. год)

  2. ^ An Introduction to the Study of Bibliography by Thomas Hartwell Horne
  3. ^ Grada za gospodarsku povijest Hrvatske. Jugoslavenska akademija znanosti i umjetnosti. 1955. p. 155. ..Drakuli, udovi Dobruška Dobrojevića... 
  4. ^ Naklada Naprijed, The Croatian Adriatic Tourist Guide, pg. 208, Zagreb (1999), ISBN 953-178-097-8
  5. ^ (Medaković 1995, p. 77)
  6. ^ (Novak 1951, p. 109)
Sources