Borjomi–Bakuriani railway "Kukushka"

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Borjomi–Bakuriani Railway LCC
Kukushka-borjomi-bakuriani-railway.jpg
Overview
Native name ბაკურიანი-ბორჯომის რკინიგზა (bak'uriani-borj'omis rk'inigza)
Termini Borjomi
Bakuriani
Stations Tsaghveri, Tsemi, Libani, Sakochavi
Website bbr.railway.ge
Technical
Line length 37.2 km (23.1 mi)
Track gauge 900 mm (2 ft 11 716 in)
Electrification 1500V DC
Route map
km
0 Borjomi
10 Daba
14 Tsagveri
18 Tsemi
19 Tba
20 Gantiadi
21 Libani
23 Patara Tsemi
31 Sakochavi
Bakuriani Andesite
32 32 km
39 Bakuriani

The Kukushka (Russian for "little cuckoo") is a 37.2-kilometre narrow-gauge railway line linking the town of Borjomi (820m asl) to the village and ski resort of Bakuriani (1,700m asl) in Georgia.

The construction of this 900 mm (2 ft 11 716 in) line began in 1897, when Georgia was still part of the Russian Empire. The difficult terrain caused construction to take four years, and the first train ran in January 1902. Gustave Eiffel was commissioned by the Romanovs to design the viaduct over the Tsemistskhali River between the stations of Tsaghveri and Tsemi.[1]

Originally, trains were pulled by a steam engine of the "Porter" type, imported from America, and passengers travelled in open carriages protected by handrails. The line was electrified in 1966, when the small steam engine was replaced by an electric "crocodile" locomotive made by the Škoda works in Czechoslovakia.

The line is currently operated by Borjomi–Bakuriani Railway LLC (BBR), a subsidiary of Georgian Railways.

Although the line was until 1991 also used to transport andesite from a mine near Bakuriani, the Kukushka is now exclusively a passenger service used by tourists and local residents. Travel time is 2.5 hours (average speed 15 km/h), and there are two trains a day in each direction.[2] Connection to Tbilisi is ensured, but not vice versa.[3]

The original steam engine (1902-1966) of the Borjomi-to-Bakuriani narrow-gauge railway line in Georgia, now on a plinth in Borjomi.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Georgian Railway". Archived from the original on 2011-10-11.
  2. ^ "Timetable". Georgian Railways.
  3. ^ ""Borjom–Bakuriani Railway" LLC". Archived from the original on 2013-05-31.