Bourdieu v. Pacific Western Oil Co.

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Bourdieu v. Pacific Western Oil Co.
Seal of the United States Supreme Court.svg
Argued October 12, 1936
Decided November 9, 1936
Full case name Bourdieu v. Pacific Western Oil Co.
Citations 299 U.S. 65 (more)
Holding
An inquiry into indispensability would be unnecessary where the complaint did not state a cause of action.
Court membership
Case opinions
Majority Sutherland
Stone took no part in the consideration or decision of the case.

Bourdieu v. Pacific Western Oil Co., 299 U.S. 65 (1936), was a decision by the United States Supreme Court, which held that an inquiry into indispensability would be unnecessary where the complaint did not state a cause of action.

Background[edit]

Pacific Western Oil Corporation was established by Edward L. Doherty in 1928 before later coming under the control of J. Paul Getty and owned oil and gas drilling rights for large sections of Fresno County, California. An agricultural landowner had "mining" rights for the same area and sued. The oil companies asserted that, since their leases were issued by the United States Secretary of State, that they could not be sued without including the U.S. government but the court disagreed.

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Colby, Wm. E. (1942). "The Law of Oil and Gas: With Special Reference to the Public Domain and Conservation". California Law Review. 30 (3): 245–271. doi:10.2307/3477673. JSTOR 3477673. 

Text of Bourdieu v. Pacific Western Oil Co., 299 U.S. 65 (1936) is available from:  Findlaw  Justia