Bruton v. United States

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Bruton v. United States
Seal of the United States Supreme Court.svg
Argued March 11, 1968
Decided May 20, 1968
Full case name Bruton v. United States
Citations 391 U.S. 123 (more)
Court membership
Chief Justice
Earl Warren
Associate Justices
Hugo Black · William O. Douglas
John M. Harlan II · William J. Brennan Jr.
Potter Stewart · Byron White
Abe Fortas · Thurgood Marshall
Case opinions
Majority Brennan, joined by Warren, Douglas, Harlan, Stewart, Fortas
Concurrence Stewart
Concurrence Black (in judgment)
Dissent White
Marshall took no part in the consideration or decision of the case.
Laws applied
U.S. Const. amend. VI

Bruton v. United States is a 1968 United States Supreme Court ruling in which the Court held that a defendant was deprived of his rights under the Confrontation Clause if a confession by his codefendant was introduced in their joint trial, regardless of whether the jury received instructions only to consider it against the confessor. This has become known as the Bruton rule.[1] The case overruled Delli Paoli v. United States (1957).[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Smith, Jessica (August 6, 2012). "The Bruton Rule: A Primer". North Carolina Criminal Law: A UNC School of Government Blog. 
  2. ^ "THE ADMISSION OF A CODEFENDANT'S CONFESSION AFTER BRUTON V. UNITED STATES: THE QUESTIONS AND A PROPOSAL FOR THEIR RESOLUTION" (PDF). Duke Law Journal.