Southern crested toad

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Southern crested toad
Bufo guentheri.JPG
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Amphibia
Order: Anura
Family: Bufonidae
Genus: Peltophryne
Species: P. guentheri
Binomial name
Peltophryne guentheri
(Cochran, 1941)
Synonyms

Bufo guentheri Cochran, 1941

The southern crested toad or Gunther's Caribbean toad (Peltophryne guentheri) is a species of toad in the family Bufonidae. It is endemic to Hispaniola and found in the lowlands of Haiti and the Dominican Republic.[2] Peltophryne fracta was described as a subspecies of this species, but is now recognized as a separate species.[3]

Description[edit]

Males grow to 74 mm (2.9 in) and females to 101 mm (4.0 in) in snout–vent length.[4]

Habitat and ecology[edit]

Natural habitats of Peltophryne guentheri are dry lowland valleys in both mesic and xeric areas.[1] These frogs have been observed to sit on or by piles of cattle manure. They appear to use sit-and-wait foraging strategy to catch insects on manure.[4]

Conservation[edit]

It is threatened by habitat loss caused by livestock grazing and selective logging, and by agricultural pollution.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Hedges, B.; Inchaustegui, S.; Hernandez, M. & Powell, R. (2004). "Peltophryne guentheri". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2015.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 14 September 2015. 
  2. ^ Frost, Darrel R. (2015). "Peltophryne guentheri (Cochran, 1941)". Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 6.0. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 14 September 2015. 
  3. ^ Frost, Darrel R. (2015). "Peltophryne fracta (Schwartz, 1972)". Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 6.0. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 14 September 2015. 
  4. ^ a b Landestoy, Miguel A.; Robert Ortíz & Patricia Torres (2015). "Use of cow manure by two sympatric species of toads in the northwestern Dominican Republic" (PDF). IRCF Reptiles & Amphibians: Conservation and Natural History. 22 (2): 83–86.