Center for Media Justice

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The Center for Media Justice, established in 2008, is a national non-profit organization based in Oakland, California. The organization's mission is "to build a powerful movement for a more just and participatory media and digital world—with racial equity and human rights for all."[1]

The Center for Media Justice's founder and current Executive Director is Malkia Cyril.[2]

Background[edit]

In 2002, leaders from We Interrupt This Message and Race Forward (formerly the Applied Research Center) launched the Youth Media Council (YMC) to counter media bias against California’s youth and people of color. As the project grew, it expanded to address inequities in media access and coverage in diverse communities by collaborating with local social justice groups nationwide. With technical support from the Movement Strategy Center, YMC staff organized these groups into the Media Action Grassroots Network (MAG-Net), and evolved to become the Center for Media Justice (CMJ). Launched in 2008, CMJ is now a nationally recognized organizing hub representing the media policy interests and building the cultural leadership of hundreds of social justice groups across the United States.[3]

Vision

CMJ has a vision that states, "Media Justice is a long-term vision to democratize the economy, government, and society through policies and practices that ensure: Media Justice is a long-term vision to democratize the economy, government, and society through policies and practices that ensure: democratic media ownership, fundamental communication rights; universal media and technology access, and meaningful, accurate representation within news and popular culture for everyone."[4]

The Center for Media Justice believes that Media Justice will be achieved when the media and cultural environment results in connected communities, fair economies, racial justice and human rights for all people; and lifts up the voices of communities of color, low-income people, and other under-represented communities.

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Published by the Youth Media Council
  • Is KMEL the people's station? : a community assessment of 106.1 KMEL. 2002
  • Speaking for ourselves : a youth assessment of local news coverage. 2002
  • The Bay Area media map : a youth organizer's guide to the media turf in the Bay Area and beyond. 2003
  • Displacing the dream : a report on Bay Area newspaper coverage of development and gentrification. [2008?]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Our Mission - The Center for Media Justice". The Center for Media Justice. Retrieved 2016-12-10. 
  2. ^ "Staff - The Center for Media Justice". The Center for Media Justice. Retrieved 2016-12-10. 
  3. ^ "About Us - The Center for Media Justice". The Center for Media Justice. Retrieved 2016-10-17. 
  4. ^ "Our Vision".