Chizhi Shizhu Hou

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Chizhishizhuhou Chanyu)
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Yufuluo
Chizhi Shizhu Hou Chanyu
Reign188-195
PredecessorQiangqu
SuccessorHuchuquan
Born150
Died195 (aged 44–45)
IssueLiu Bao
FatherQiangqu
Yufuluo
Traditional Chinese於夫羅
Simplified Chinese于夫罗

Chizhi Shizhu Hou (Chinese: 持至尸逐侯; 150–196; r. 188–195 AD), personal name Yufuluo (於夫羅), was a puppet chanyu of the Southern Xiongnu during the late Han Dynasty. In 188, he was appointed chanyu by the Han court following the murder of his father Qiangqu and would later gain the Xiongnu title of Chizhi Shizhu Hou.

Biography[edit]

In 184, Qiangqu sent Yufuluo to assist the Han in fighting the Yellow Turban Rebellion.[1]

After Qiangqu's death in 188, the Han court attempted to appoint the Western Tuqi Prince Yufuluo[2] as chanyu, instead of using the traditional Xiongnu election system. The southern Xiongnu dissented and elected a lawful alternate leader of the Xubu line. Later they expelled Yufuluo, who fled to the Han imperial court. When the marquis of Xubu died the next year an elderly king became the nominal head of state without the title of chanyu and the Southern Xiongnu ceased to exist as a coherent entity.[3]

Yufuluo fled to the Han court but found no support after the death of Emperor Ling of Han in 189. He became a wandering mercenary, working under the Yellow Turbans, Yuan Shao, and the Heishan bandits of Zhang Yan. After suffering several defeats to Cao Cao, Yufuluo relocated to Pingyang County close to the Fen River. He died in 195 and his remaining followers joined his brother Huchuquan.[4]

Yufuluo's grandson Liu Yuan went on to found the state of Han Zhao in the fourth century.[1]

Family[edit]

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Crespigny 2007, p. 1020.
  2. ^ Bichurin, p. 146
  3. ^ de Crespigny 2017, p. 426.
  4. ^ de Crespigny 2017, p. 1020.

References[edit]

  • Barfield, Thomas (1989), The Perilous Frontier: Nomadic Empires and China, Basil Blackwell
  • Bichurin N.Ya., "Collection of information on peoples in Central Asia in ancient times", vol. 1, p. 146, Sankt Petersburg, 1851, reprint Moscow-Leningrad, 1950 [1] (Qian Han Shu Ch. 94b)
  • Chang, Chun-shu (2007), The Rise of the Chinese Empire 1, The University of Michigan Press
  • Cosmo, Nicola Di (2002), Ancient China and Its Enemies, Cambridge University Press
  • Cosmo, Nicola di (2009), Military Culture in Imperial China, Harvard University Press
  • Crespigny, Rafe de (2007), A Biographical Dictionary of Later Han to the Three Kingdoms, Brill
  • de Crespigny, Rafe (2017), Fire Over Luoyang: A History of the Later Han Dynasty, 23-220 AD, Brill
  • Loewe, Michael (2000), A Biographical Dictionary of the Qin, Former Han, and Xin Periods, Brill
  • Taskin B.S., "Materials on Sünnu history", Science, Moscow, 1968, p. 31 (In Russian)
  • Whiting, Marvin C. (2002), Imperial Chinese Military History, Writers Club Press


Preceded by
Jiangqu
Chanyu of the southern Xiongnu
188–189 AD
Succeeded by
Huchuquan