Convocation of Anglicans in North America

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Convocation of Anglicans in North America
Convocation of Anglicans in North America Logo.jpg
Location
Ecclesiastical province Church of Nigeria/Anglican Church in North America
Statistics
Parishes 69
Members c. 10,000[1]
Information
Rite Anglican
Current leadership
Bishop Julian Dobbs
Website
Convocation of Anglicans in North America

The Convocation of Anglicans in North America (CANA) is a missionary body of the Church of Nigeria and a dual jurisdiction of the Anglican Church in North America. Founded in 2005,[2] it is composed primarily of churches that have disaffiliated from the Episcopal Church in the United States of America (ECUSA). CANA was initially a missionary initiative of the Anglican Church of Nigeria for Nigerians living in the United States. It joined several other church bodies in the formation of the Anglican Church in North America in 2009. In 2012, it launched his first offshoot diocese in the United States, the Missionary Diocese of the Trinity, a dual jurisdiction of the Church of Nigeria and ACNA.

Leadership[edit]

In June 2006, Martyn Minns, then the rector of Truro Church in Fairfax, Virginia, was elected by the Anglican Church of Nigeria as the missionary bishop for CANA. Minns was consecrated in Abuja, Nigeria, in August 2006 and installed as missionary bishop in May 2007. He retired in January 2014 and was succeeded as missionary bishop by Julian Dobbs, who is also the diocesan bishop of the Missionary Diocese of CANA East.

As of March 2015, CANA has an additional six bishops serving in various sub-jurisdictions or other ministries:

Core values[edit]

CANA was formed primarily in reaction to the departure of the Episcopal Church USA from orthodox Christian faith and Anglican praxis, particularly by the American mainline church's rebellion against the international Anglican Communion resolutions at the Lambeth Conference 1998, the Windsor Report, Dromantine (Ireland), and at Dar es Salaam (Tanzania) — including the ordination of non-celibate homosexual clergy, which it opposes as deviant and sinful.

Present[edit]

CANA reports that it has grown since its founding in 2005. It currently reports 69 congregations, maintains a presence in 21 states and in the District of Columbia, and has an ethnically diverse membership. In 2012, CANA launched the Missionary Diocese of the Trinity as a dual diocese of the ACNA and the Church of Nigeria. CANA originated three new dioceses: East, West and Armed Forces and Chaplaincy.[4]

Ecumenical relations[edit]

In October 2009, CANA's leadership reacted to the Catholic Church's proposed creation of personal ordinariates for disaffected traditionalist Anglicans by saying that this provision would probably not have a great impact on the majority of its largely Low Church laity and clergy, who are satisfied with the Anglican realignment movement.[5]

References[edit]

External links[edit]