Dahlia Gredinger

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Dahlia Greidinger (1926-1979) was an Israeli scientist who helped develop the country's chemical industry.

Biography[edit]

Dahlia Greidinger was born on July 27, 1926 in Neve Tzedek, Tel-Aviv. She was a fifth generation Israeli. Her parents were Miriam Rokach and Joseph Katzenelbogen-Katz. She attended the Hebrew Reali School of Haifa. She earned an M.Sc. in Chemistry from the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, where she graduated with distinction. She married Coleman Greidinger in October 1950. She died of cancer in 1979 after battling the disease for ten years.

Scientific career[edit]

In 1951, Greidinger became a teaching and research assistant at the Technion — Israel Institute of Technology. After completing her doctorate in 1958, she began working at Deshanim Fertilizers & Chemicals Ltd. By 1969, she was appointed director of Research and Development and elected to the board of directors.[1] The company grew to become Israel's largest supplier of fertilizers.

Greidinger wrote for scientific publications and was the holder of several patents, among them a patent on Controlled release particulate fertilizer composition[2] 'Stable liquid N-P-K fertilizer composition and method of use',[3] a liquid fertilizer composition storable for 6–8 months, and Solid Ammonium Polyphosphate Compositions and Manufacture.[4] She was a member of the European Committee for Expansion, the Association of Academic Women and the Anti-Cancer Association.

Legacy[edit]

The Feinberg Graduate School of Weizmann Institute of Science awards a fellowship for cancer research financed by the Dahlia Greidinger Anti-Cancer Fund. In honor of her contributions in the field of chemistry and fertilization systems, the family established the Dahlia Greidinger Fertilizer Research Fund.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]