Dick Scott (historian)

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Dick Scott

BornRichard George Scott
1923
Palmerston North, New Zealand
LanguageEnglish
Alma materMassey College
GenreNon-fiction
SubjectNew Zealand and Pacific history
Notable awardsPrime Minister's Award for Literary Achievement
RelativesRosie Scott (daughter)

Richard George Scott ONZM (born 1923) is a New Zealand historian and journalist.

Work[edit]

His first book, 151 Days, an account of the 1951 New Zealand waterfront dispute, was published in 1952.[1]

Scott's most well-known work is Ask That Mountain (1975), which recounts the events of the non-violent Māori resistance to European occupation at Parihaka. The story had largely been forgotten by non-Māori New Zealanders until the book's publication. It has been reprinted nine times, and former New Zealand Prime Minister, Helen Clark, called it "one of New Zealand's most influential books".[2][3] Scott also published an earlier, briefer account of the events in 1954, The Parihaka Story.[1]

Scott has written several histories related to the Auckland region, such as In Old Mount Albert: Being a History of the District (1961), Fire on the Clay: The Pakeha Comes to West Auckland (1979) and Seven Lives on Salt River (1979), which won the New Zealand Book Award for Non-fiction. He has also written more general New Zealand works, including Inheritors of a Dream: A Pictorial History of New Zealand (1962) and Winemakers of New Zealand (1964), and Pacific histories such as Years of the Pooh-Bah: A Cook Islands History (1991) and Would a Good Man Die? Niue Island, New Zealand, and the late Mr Larsen (1993).[1]

In 2004, Scott published his autobiography, Dick Scott: A Radical Writer's Life, which recounts his early years in the Communist Party, as well as his writing approach and career.[3][4]

Scott has stated that he no longer writes, and hasn't re-read any of his books for "as long as I can remember ... You don't re-read old history".[5]

Awards[edit]

Scott was appointed an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit for services to historical research in the 2002 Queen's Birthday and Golden Julbilee Honours,[6] and in 2007 he received the Prime Minister's Award for Literary Achievement in Non-fiction.[3]

Personal life[edit]

Scott has five children, and lives with his second wife in the suburb of Mount Eden, in Auckland, New Zealand. One of his children is the novelist Rosie Scott.[5]

In 2011, Scott made headlines when he auctioned a Don Binney painting that he had owned for almost 50 years, and donated the NZD $300,000 proceeds to the Christchurch earthquake appeal.[5][7]

Selected works[edit]

  • 151 Days (1952) Penguin. ISBN 0-7900-0783-5
  • The Parihaka Story (1954) Southern Cross Books.
  • In Old Mount Albert: Being a History of the District (1961) Southern Cross Books.
  • Inheritors of a Dream: A Pictorial History of New Zealand (1962) Longman Paul. ISBN 0-582-73815-6
  • Winemakers of New Zealand (1964) Southern Cross Books.
  • Stock in Trade: Hellaby’s First Hundred Years (1973) Southern Cross Books.
  • Ask That Mountain: The Story of Parihaka (1975) Heinemann. ISBN 0-14-301086-7
  • Stake in the Country: Assid Abraham Corban (1977) Reed Books. ISBN 0-7900-0875-0
  • Fire on the Clay: The Pakeha Comes to West Auckland (1979) Southern Cross Books.
  • Seven Lives on Salt River (1979) Penguin. ISBN 0-7900-0708-8
  • Years of the Pooh-Bah: A Cook Islands History (1991) Cook Islands Trading Corporation. ISBN 0-340-55489-4
  • Would a Good Man Die? Niue Island, New Zealand, and the late Mr Larsen (1993) Hodder & Stoughton. ISBN 0-340-59953-7
  • Pioneers of New Zealand wine (2002) Reed Books/Southern Cross Books. ISBN 0-7900-0832-7
  • Dick Scott: A Radical Writer's Life (2004) Reed Books. ISBN 0-7900-0976-5

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Robinson, Roger; Wattie, Nelson, eds. (1998). The Oxford Companion to New Zealand Literature. Oxford University Press.
  2. ^ "Dick Scott - The New Word". Creative New Zealand. Retrieved 11 February 2012.
  3. ^ a b c "Scott, Dick". New Zealand Book Council. Retrieved 11 February 2012.
  4. ^ Stone, Russell (6 December 2004). "Dick Scott: A Radical Writer's Life (review)". New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 11 February 2012.
  5. ^ a b c Hewitson, Michele (2 April 2011). "Michele Hewitson Interview: Dick Scott". New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 11 February 2012.
  6. ^ "Queen's Birthday and Golden Jubilee honours list 2002". Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. 3 June 2002. Retrieved 19 April 2015.
  7. ^ "Lot 26: Kotare Over Ratana Church, Te Kao". Webb's. Archived from the original on 19 January 2012. Retrieved 11 February 2012.