Ancient Diocese of Comminges

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The former French Catholic diocese of Comminges existed at least from the sixth century, to the French Revolution. The seat of the bishops was at Saint-Bertrand-de-Comminges, now no more than a village, in the modern department of Haute-Garonne in south-west France. The territory of the old diocese now belongs to the archdiocese of Toulouse. The name of Comminges was incorporated into the titulature of the Archbishop of Toulouse on 19 January 1935. He is now the Archbishop of Toulouse-Saint Bertrand de Comminges-Rieux.[1]

History[edit]

The earliest Bishop of Comminges known by name is Suavis, who assisted at the Council of Agde in 506, along with thirty-four other bishops.[2] Sidonius Apollinaris,[3] however, speaks of the persecutions suffered at the hands of the Arian Goths in the fifth century by a bishop of Comminges.[4]

Among the bishops of Comminges[5] were:

In the church of St. Bertrand of Comminges (The gothic church is of the XIV century), baptism was administered with peculiar ceremonies: the baptismal water was placed in a silver dove with wings displayed (a symbol of the Holy Spirit), and enclosed in a cupola surmounting the font; at the moment of baptizing the dove was lowered over the head of the child by a pulley, and through its open beak the baptismal water was poured (as though grace from heaven).[9]

Bishops[edit]

To 1000[edit]

  • Suavis 506–?
  • Presidius 533–?
  • Amelius 549–?
  • Rufin 584–588
  • Abraham 788–?
  • Involatus 879–?
  • Oriol 980–?
  • Bertrand Roger 990–?

1000–1300[edit]

  • Peter I. 1003–?
  • Arnaud I. 1035–?
  • William I. 1040–1055
  • Bernhard II. 1056–?
  • William II. 1068–?
  • Olger (Ulger)  ?–1073?
  • Saint Bertrand 1073–1126
  • Roger de Nuro 1126?–1153?
  • Arnaud Roger 1153–1176
  • Arsius (Arsenius) 1179–1188
  • Raymond Arnaud 1188–1205
  • Sperague (Hisparigus) 1205–1206
  • Adhémar du Châtel 1207–1209
  • Garcias de Lorte 1210–1217
  • Grimoard I. 1217–1240
  • Arnaud III. Roger 1241–1260
  • Guillaume III. d'Audiran 1260–1263
  • Bertrand de Miramont 1263–1286
  • Bertrand de Got[10] 1295–1299
  • Boso de Salignac 1299–1315[11]

1300–1500[edit]

  • Bernardus, O.P. (1316-1317)
  • Pierre Vital de Millario 1317–1318
  • Scot de Linières 1318–1325
  • Guillaume de Cun 1325–1336
  • Hugues de Castillon[12] 1336–1351
  • Bertrand de Cosnac 1352–1371[13] (Cardinal from 1371)
  • Guillaume d'Espagne 6 June 1371–1382
  • Amelius (Amelie) II. de Lautrec 1384–1390 (Cardinal from 1385)
  • Menaud de Barbazan 1390–1421
  • Pierre de Foix 7 August 1422–1451[14] (Cardinal from 1412 or 1413)[15]
  • Arnaud-Raymond V. d'Espagne 1451–146?[16]
  • Jean de Foix 9 May 1466–1499[17]

From 1500[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ David M. Cheney, Catholic-Hierarchy: Archdiocese of Toulouse (-Saint Bertrand de Comminges-Rieux), retrieved: 2016-08-04.[self-published source]
  2. ^ J.D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio Tomus octavus (8) (Florence 1762), p. 337.
  3. ^ Epistles, Book VII, letter 6, § 7, to Bishop Basilius (ca. 472/473): propter quod discite cito catholici status valetudinem occultam, ut apertam festinetis adhibere medicinam. Burdigala, Petrogorii, Ruteni, Lemovices, Gabalitani, Helusani, Vasates, Convenae, Auscenses multosque iam maior numerus civitatum summis sacerdotibus ipsorum morte truncatus nec ullis deinceps episcopis in defunctorum officia suffectis...
  4. ^ Georges Goyau, "Toulouse," Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume XIV (New York 1912), p. 796.
  5. ^ Saint Africus (c. 540), who died in the Rouergue, is wrongly included among the bishops of Comminges.
  6. ^ Eubel, I, p. 21. Bertrand de Cosnac died on 17 June 1374.
  7. ^ Eubel, I, p. 28. Amelius died in Avignon on 7 June 1390
  8. ^ D'Albret was appointed by Pope Alexander VI, but the Cathedral Chapter elected Gaillard de Hospitali, a canon of the Cathedral. Litigation ensued, but when Gaillard died, Pope Leo X adjudged the bishopric to Cardinal d'Albret in 1514. Eubel, III, p. 6 and p. 177, with n. 3. Amanieu d'Albret was created a cardinal on 28 September 1500, and died in Rome on 20 December 1520.
  9. ^ Catholic Encyclopedia: Toulouse Agos, Vie et miracles de Saint Bertrand, pp. 206-207.
  10. ^ J. Lestrade (1906). ""Un curieux groupe d' évêques Commingeois: I. Bertrand de Got". Revue de Comminges. 21: 97–110; 145–158.  He was given the bishopric of Comminges by Boniface VIII, and was approved as Archbishop of Bordeaux on 23 December 1299: Eubel, I, p. 150.
  11. ^ Eubel, I, p. 207, 150. He was approved by Boniface VIII on 22 December 1299
  12. ^ J. Lestrade (1907). ""Un curieux groupe d' évêques Commingeois: II. Hugues de Castillon (1335-1352)". Revue de Comminges. 22: 36–43. 
  13. ^ Eubel, I, p. 207.
  14. ^ Eubel, I, p. 207; II, p. 135.
  15. ^ Pierre de Foix was created cardinal by Pope John XXIII. He died on 13 December 1464. Eubel, II, p. 4.
  16. ^ Eubel, II, p. 135.
  17. ^ Eubel, II, p. 135. Cf. J. Lestrade (1907). ""Un curieux groupe d' évêques Commingeois: III. Jean-Baptiste de Foix (1466-1501)". Revue de Comminges. 22: 76–95. 
  18. ^ J. Lestrade (1907). ""Un curieux groupe d' évêques Commingeois: IV. Gaillard de l'Hôpital (1501-1514)". Revue de Comminges. 22: 128–144. 
  19. ^ J. Lestrade (1908). ""Un curieux groupe d' évêques Commingeois: VI. Jean Bertrandi (1555-1556)". Revue de Comminges. 23: 150–155. 
  20. ^ Carlo Carafa was nominated by King Henri II when he was Papal Legate in France in 1556. He was not ordained a deacon until 15 April 1557, and was never ordained priest or consecrated bishop: Salvador Miranda, The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church: Carafa, Carlo, retrieved: 2016-08-01. J. Lestrade (1908). ""Un curieux groupe d' évêques Commingeois: VII. Charles Caraffa (1556-1561)". Revue de Comminges. 23: 161–163. 
  21. ^ J. Lestrade (1908). ""Un curieux groupe d' évêques Commingeois: VIII. Pierre d'Albret (1561-1568)". Revue de Comminges. 23: 163–168. 
  22. ^ J. Lestrade (1908). ""Un curieux groupe d' évêques Commingeois: IX. Urbain de Saint-Gelais (1570-1613)". Revue de Comminges. 23: 254–266. 
  23. ^ J. Lestrade (1909). ""Un curieux groupe d' évêques Commingeois: XIII. Hugues de Labatut (1640-1644)". Revue de Comminges. 24 (4): 232–240. , including his Last Will and Testament, and codicil.
  24. ^ C. Espénan (1904). "Gilbert de Choiseul, évêque de Comminges, puis de Tournai (1613-1689)" (PDF). Revue de Comminges. 19: 123–138. 
  25. ^ Armand Jean (1891). Les évêques et les archevêques de France depuis 1682 jusqu'à 1801 (in French). A. Picard. p. 80. 
  26. ^ David M. Cheney, Catholic-Hierarchy: Bishop Olivier-Gabriel de Lubières (Nubières) du Bouchet, retrieved: 2016-08-04.[self-published source]
  27. ^ J. Lestrade (1911). ""Un curieux groupe d' évêques Commingeois: XVIII. Antoine de Lastic (1740-1764)". Revue de Comminges. 26: 199–210; 241–247. 
  28. ^ Jean, p. 81.
  29. ^ Bishop d'Osmond resigned in accordance with the request of Pope Pius VII, who had concluded a Concordat with First Consul Napoleon Bonaparte, which liquidated the Constitutional church. Osmond was then appointed Bishop of Nancy. Ritzler, VI, p. 181, note 4. Jean, pp. 81-82. J. Lestrade, "Un curieux groupe d' évêques Commingeois: XX. Antoine Eustache d'Osmond (1754-1823)," Revue de Comminges (Pyrénées Centrales) (in French). 27. Saint Gaudens: Société des études du Comminges. 1912. pp. 1–16. 

Bibliography[edit]

Studies[edit]

See also[edit]

Coordinates: 43°01′37″N 0°34′15″E / 43.0269°N 0.5709°E / 43.0269; 0.5709