Dioxosuccinic acid

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Dioxosuccinic acid
Skeletal formula
Ball-and-stick model
Names
IUPAC name
Dioxosuccinic acid
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.028.622
Properties
C4H2O6
Molar mass 146.05 g·mol−1
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Dioxosuccinic acid or dioxobutanedioic acid is an organic compound with formula C4H2O6 or HO−(C=O)4−OH.

Removal of two protons from the molecule would yield the dioxosuccinate anion, C
4
O2−
6
or O−(C=O)4−O. This is one of the oxocarbon anions, which consist solely of carbon and oxygen. The name is also used for salts containing that anion, and for esters with the [−O−(C=O)4−O−] moiety.

Removal of a single proton would result in the monovalent anion hydrogendioxosuccinate, C
4
HO
6
or HO−(C=O)4−O.

Occurrence[edit]

Dioxosuccinic acid is one of the acids occurring naturally in wine, from the oxidation of tartaric acid via dihydroxyfumaric acid.[1]

Reactions[edit]

The acid combines with two molecules of water to produce dihydroxytartaric acid, C4H6O8 or HO−(C=O)−(C(OH)2)2−(C=O)−OH. Indeed, the product traded under the name "dioxosuccinic acid hydrate" appears to be that substance.

On the other hand, dihydroxytartaric acid behaves like dioxosuccinic acid in some reactions; for example, it reacts with ethanol in the presence of hydrogen chloride to yield the ester diethyl dioxosuccinate.[2]:p.187

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ján Farkaš, Beatrix Farkaš (1988), Technology and Biochemistry of Wine. CRC Press, 744 pages. ISBN 2-88124-070-4.
  2. ^ Victorian College of Pharmacy, Dept. of Chemistry (1959), Notes on qualitative analysis.