Sorbitan monostearate

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Sorbitan monostearate
Sorbitan monostearate.svg
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
(2R)-2-[(2R,3R,4S)-3,4-Dihydroxyoxolan-2-yl]-2-hydroxyethyl octadecanoate
Identifiers
  • 1338-41-6 checkY
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.014.241 Edit this at Wikidata
E number E491 (thickeners, ...)
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C24H46O6/c1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-11-12-13-14-15-16-17-22(27)29-19-21(26)24-23(28)20(25)18-30-24/h20-21,23-26,28H,2-19H2,1H3/t20-,21+,23+,24+/m0/s1 checkY
    Key: HVUMOYIDDBPOLL-XWVZOOPGSA-N checkY
  • InChI=1/C24H46O6/c1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-11-12-13-14-15-16-17-22(27)29-19-21(26)24-23(28)20(25)18-30-24/h20-21,23-26,28H,2-19H2,1H3/t20-,21+,23+,24+/m0/s1
    Key: HVUMOYIDDBPOLL-XWVZOOPGBK
  • O[C@H](COC(=O)CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC)[C@H]1OC[C@H](O)[C@H]1O
Properties
C24H46O6
Molar mass 430.62 g/mol
Appearance Waxy powder
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
☒N verify (what is checkY☒N ?)
Infobox references

Sorbitan monostearate is an ester of sorbitan (a sorbitol derivative) and stearic acid and is sometimes referred to as a synthetic wax.[1]

Uses[edit]

Sorbitan monostearate is used in the manufacture of food and healthcare products as a non-ionic surfactant with emulsifying, dispersing, and wetting properties.[citation needed] It is also employed to create synthetic fibers, metal machining fluid, and as a brightener in the leather industry. Sorbitans are also known as "Spans".

Sorbitan monostearate has been approved by the European Union for use as a food additive (emulsifier) (E number: E 491).[2] It is also approved for use by the British Pharmacopoeia.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ingredients – Sorbitan Monostearate at sci-toys.com
  2. ^ Current EU approved additives and their E Numbers, Food Standards Agency, 26 November 2010
  3. ^ The British Pharmacopoeia Secretariat (2009). "Index, BP 2009" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 11 April 2009. Retrieved 18 March 2010.