Enguerrand II, Count of Ponthieu

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Enguerrand II (d. 25 October 1053) was the son of Hugh II count of Ponthieu. He assumed the county upon the death of his father on November 20, 1052.

Life[edit]

Enguerrand II was the eldest son and heir of Hugh II, Count of Ponthieu and his wife Bertha of Aumale, heiress of Aumale.[1] Enguerrand was married to Adelaide, daughter of Robert I, Duke of Normandy and sister of William the Conqueror.[2] But at the Council of Reims in 1049, when the proposed marriage of Duke William with Matilda of Flanders was prohibited based on consanguinity, so was Enguerrand's existing marriage to Adelaide, causing him to be excommunicated.[3] The marriage was apparently annulled c.1049/50.[4] He had given her in dower, Aumale, which she retained after the dissolution of their marriage.[5]

The Conqueror's uncle, William of Arques, who had originally challenged Duke William's right to the duchy based on his illegitimacy, had been given the county of Talou by Duke William as a fief, but still defiant and on his own authority proceeded to build a strong castle at Arques.[6] Enguerrand was allied to William of Arques by virtue of the latter being married to Enguerrand's sister.[1] By 1053 William of Arques was in open revolt against Duke William and Henry I of France came to William of Arques' aid invading Normandy and attempting to relieve the castle of Arques.[7] Duke William had put Arques under siege, but had remained mobile with another force in the countryside nearby.[8] To relieve the siege Enguerrand was with Henry I of France and on October 25, 1053 was killed when the Normans feigned a retreat in which Enguerrand and his companions followed and were ambushed, a tactic the Normans used again to great success at the Battle of Hastings.[7]

Issue[edit]

Enguerrand married Adelaide of Normandy, Countess of Aumale, daughter of Robert I, Duke of Normandy.[a][9] By her he had a daughter:

As Enguerrand died without male issue[10] he was followed by his brother Guy I as Count of Ponthieu.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Detlev Schwennicke, Europäische Stammtafeln: Stammtafeln zur Geschichte der Europäischen Staaten, Neue Folge, Band III Teilband 4 (Verlag von J. A. Stargardt, Marburg, Germany, 1989), Tafel 635
  2. ^ George Edward Cokayne, The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant Extinct or Dormant, ed. Vicary Gibbs, Vol. I (The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., London, 1910), pp. 350-2
  3. ^ Kathleen Thompson, 'Being the Ducal Sister: The Role of Adelaide of Aumale', Normandy and its Neighbours 900-1250; Essays for David Bates, ed. David Crouch, Kathleen Thompson (Brepols Publishers, Belgium, 2011), p. 68
  4. ^ Kathleen Thompson, 'Being the Ducal Sister: The Role of Adelaide of Aumale', Normandy and its Neighbours 900-1250; Essays for David Bates, ed. David Crouch, Kathleen Thompson (Brepols Publishers, Belgium, 2011), p. 71
  5. ^ Collectanea topographica et genealogica, Volume 6, ed. Frederic Madden, Bulkeley Bandinel, John G. Nichols (John B. Nichols & Sons, London, 1840), p. 265
  6. ^ Elisabeth Van Houts, The Normans in Europe (Manchester University Press, Manchester & New York, 2000), p. 68
  7. ^ a b Jim Bradbury, The Routledge Companion to Medieval Warfare (Routledge, NY, 2004), pp. 160-1
  8. ^ David C. Douglas, William the Conqueror (University of California Press, Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1964), p. 388
  9. ^ George Andrews Moriarty, The Plantagenet Ancestry of King Edward III and Queen Philippa (Mormon Pioneer Genealogy Society, Salt Lake City, UT, 1985), p. 13
  10. ^ a b George Edward Cokayne, The Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant Extinct or Dormant, ed. Vicary Gibbs, Vol. I (The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., London, 1910), p. 351
  11. ^ Thomas Stapleton, 'Observations on the History of Adeliza, Sister of William the Conqueror', Archaeologia, Vol. 26 (J.B. Nichols & Sons, 1836), pp. 349-360

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The name of Adelaide's mother remains unsettled. David C. Douglas [William the Conqueror, 1964, pp. 381] stated that William had a sister or half-sister Adelaide; that she may have been the daughter of Robert I by a mistress other than Herleva, but that "it is more probable she was the Conqueror's sister of the whole blood". As such the question remains open.
Preceded by
Hugh II
Count of Ponthieu
1052–1053
Succeeded by
Guy I