Ezulwini Valley

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Ezulwini Valley is a valley of northwest Swaziland. Also known as "The Valley of Heaven", the valley lasts for about 30 kilometres, and is bounded to the east by the Mdzimba hills.[1][2] The historical capital of Swaziland Lobamba is located in the valley, also known as the Royal Valley, a place of many legends of Swazi history. The main highway is the MR3 road; some parts have four lanes.[3][4] The valley extends as far down as Kwaluseni.[5] The valley contains a number of notable wildlife sanctuaries and features including the 4,500 hectare Mlilwane Wildlife Sanctuary (established in 1964[2]) and the Royal Swazi Sun Hotel.[5] The valley is undergoing significant development with the growth of Tourism in Swaziland, with the building of "tacky"[6] casinos, bars, hotels, shops such as the Gables Shopping Centre and urbanization.[5] Also of note is the Ezulwini Handicrafts Centre and Swazi National Museum in Lobamba. Despite the urban developments in the valley the landscape still has some "soft green hills and plains-game grazing in the lush lands below."[7]

Further reading[edit]


  1. ^ Turco, Marco (31 October 1994). Visitors' guide to Swaziland: how to get there, what to see, where to stay. Southern Book Publishers. pp. 67–. ISBN 978-1-86812-530-2. Retrieved 22 March 2012. 
  2. ^ a b Olivier, Willie; Olivier, Sandra (August 1998). Overland Through Southern Africa. Struik. p. 70. ISBN 978-1-86872-105-4. Retrieved 22 March 2012. 
  3. ^ "Mantenga Lodge". Swazi Travel. Retrieved 22 March 2012. 
  4. ^ Pinchuck, Tony; McCrea, Barbara; Reid, Donald (1 July 2002). Rough Guide to South Africa, Lesotho & Swaziland. Rough Guides. p. 801. ISBN 978-1-85828-853-6. Retrieved 22 March 2012. 
  5. ^ a b c "Ezulwini Valley". Lonely Planet. Retrieved 22 March 2012. 
  6. ^ Fitzpatrick, Mary; Armstrong, Kate (2000). South Africa, Lesotho & Swaziland. Lonely Planet. p. 582. ISBN 978-1-74059-970-2. Retrieved 22 March 2012. 
  7. ^ Hilton-Barber, Bridget (2001). Weekends with Soul. New Africa Books. p. 159. ISBN 978-0-86486-483-3. Retrieved 22 March 2012.