FBLA-PBL

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FBLA-PBL
FBLA PBL Logo.png
Logo for FBLA-PBL, Inc.
Formation 1940
Type Career and Technical Student Organization (CTSO)
Purpose To bring business and education together in a positive working relationship through innovative leadership and career development programs.
Headquarters FBLA-PBL National Center
1912 Association Drive
Reston, Virginia, U.S. 20191-1591
Membership
253,365 (2008)
Official language
English
National Presidents
NieI Patel, FBLA
Albert Amaya, PBL
Blake Reynolds, FBLA-PBL PDJean Buckley, FBLA-PBL
Website www.fbla-pbl.org www.fbla.org
"FBLA" redirects here. For other uses, see FBLA (disambiguation).

The Future Business Leaders of America-Phi Beta Lambda, or FBLA-PBL (FBLA-ΦΒΛ), is an American career and technical student organization that has its headquarters in Reston, Virginia. Established in 1940, FBLA-PBL is a non-profit organization of high school ("FBLA"), middle school ("Middle Level"), and college ("PBL") students, as well as professional members ("Professional Division"), who primarily help students transition to the business world. FBLA-PBL is the largest student-run organization in the United States of America, with 253,365 members, and one of the largest business-related organizations in the world. Local FBLA-PBL chapters are often connected to their school's business education department, and most advisers are business education teachers. It is one of the top 10 organizations listed by the U.S. Department of Education.[1] FBLA's national charity partner is the March of Dimes, and the March of Dimes provides grants of $1,000 for local chapters and $2,500 for state chapters to promote their goals.

History[edit]

FBLA-PBL was created by Hamden Forkner of Columbia University. Forkner, who also created the Forkner shorthand system, proposed that there should be one national organization to join the business clubs throughout the nation. The name "Future Business Leaders of America" was selected in 1940 and two years later the first chapter was created at Science Hill High School in Johnson City, Tennessee. In 1958, PBL is founded with the first chapter at the University of Northern Iowa and in 1979 the Alumni Division (now the Professional Division) was founded.

Key Milestones[edit]

  • 1973 : Edward D. Miller becomes FBLA's first full-time executive director
  • 1981: The Conrad N. Hilton Foundation gifts 1.6 acres of land to FBLA-PBL to build the National Center in Reston, VA
  • 1987: National Membership surpasses 200,000
  • 1991: The FBLA National Center is opened

Governance[edit]

The organization is governed by its Board of Directors, which consists of the CEO, business leaders, state educators, business education teachers, and the three division national presidents.[2]

FBLA-PBL's membership is represented by the FBLA, PBL and Professional Division national officer leadership teams. For FBLA and PBL, the officers are elected by voting delegates at the National Leadership Conference (NLC) and installed during the Awards of Excellence Program.

The Professional Division officers are elected by electronic ballot in the spring of each year. The Professional Division president serves a two-year term.

The FBLA and PBL officer teams consist of a president, secretary, treasurer, parliamentarian, and five vice presidents representing each region.

FBLA-PBL divides the United States in five administrative regions. These regions are Western, Mountain Plains, North Central, Southern, and Eastern.[3]

Each state then has what is called a State Chapter, which has its own State Officer Team. The roles in each State Officer Team vary by state, but each usually contains a President, Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, and a Parliamentarian. Some also have Historians, Webmasters, and Reporters.[4] Some states are then divided into regions, districts, or areas. These are often governed by an elected officer who serves on the State Officer Team. Just like the national regional executive boards, there are small-scale boards in most regions, districts, and/or areas in most states.[citation needed]

Finally, each chapter has its own officer team. Chapter offices vary by chapter. While most use a structure similar to that of the national officers, other use a corporate-style structure with offices such as CEO, CIO, etc. More information can be found on the national FBLA-PBL website.

Structure[edit]

FBLA is composed of four divisions: FBLA, PBL, Professional Division and FBLA-Middle Level. Each division except for Middle Level (the FBLA National Officers also represent Middle Level) has their own National Officer team, and most states have a FBLA and PBL state officer team. Some states have Middle Level and Professional Division state officer teams.

FBLA[edit]

FBLA is the largest division of FBLA-PBL with over 214,000 members. Palm Beach Gardens (FL) and Ballard (KY) High Schools are the largest FBLA chapters in the nation, while Georgia is the largest state chapter. FBLA is separated into five regions: Eastern, Southern, North Central, Mountain Plains and Western. International chapters are part of the Eastern Region. To charter a FBLA state chapter, a state must have at least five local chapters.

PBL[edit]

PBL is the collegiate division of FBLA-PBL with about 10,000 members. PBL can be found in traditional four year colleges, community colleges and career training programs. PBL attends the National Fall Leadership Conferences with FBLA, but has their own National Leadership Conference (NLC) prior to FBLA's NLC. To charter a PBL state chapter, a state must have at least three local chapters.

Professional Division[edit]

FBLA-PBL's Professional Division was originally founded as the Alumni Division, but had a name change in order to expand to include not only to FBLA alumni, but also the general business community.

FBLA Middle Level[edit]

Students in grades 5-9 are eligible to be in FBLA Middle Level. Watson Duncan Middle School (FL) is the largest FBLA Middle Level school and Arkansas is the largest FBLA Middle Level state chapter.

Notable Programs[edit]

FBLA-PBL National Awards Program[edit]

FBLA-PBL has over 50 competitive events for FBLA and PBL members. Members compete on the regional, state and national level against their peers in their respective position. There are also open events for Middle Level and Professional Division members on the national level.

Adviser Wall of Fame[edit]

The FBLA-PBL Adviser Wall of Fame recognizes advisers who have given back to the organization through their support for their local or state chapter. To be eligible, an adviser must have at least 20 years of service to FBLA.

Gold Seal Chapter Award of Merit[edit]

Also known as the Hollis and Kitty Guy Award, each chapter may select either 2 chapters or 15% of its total number of chapters (whichever is larger) to be named Gold Seal Chapters on the national level.

Chapter Challenge[5][edit]

  • Super Sweeps has chapters complete 10 tasks focused on recruitment and retention.
  • Non-Stop November has chapters complete 5 tasks focused on membership involvement, March of Dimes Prematurity Awareness Month and American Enterprise Day.
  • Action Awareness has chapters complete 4 tasks related to FBLA-PBL week, CTSO Month and America Saves.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Future Business Leaders of America-Phi Beta Lambda". Fbla-pbl.org. 1942-02-03. Retrieved 2012-03-11. 
  2. ^ "Future Business Leaders of America-Phi Beta Lambda". Fbla-pbl.org. Retrieved 2012-03-11. 
  3. ^ "FBLA-PBL Regions". Regions.fbla-pbl.org. Retrieved 2012-03-11. 
  4. ^ "FBLA-PBL Regions". Regions.fbla-pbl.org. Retrieved 2012-03-11. 
  5. ^ "FBLA CMH" (PDF). 

External links[edit]