Frederick Taylor University

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Frederick Taylor University
Type Private, Distance Learning
Established 1994[citation needed]
Location Moraga, California, California, United States
Website www.ftu.edu

Frederick Taylor University is a state approved, but unaccredited private institution of higher learning located in Moraga, California, in Contra Costa County, offering undergraduate and graduate level distance education programs in business.

Frederick Taylor International University was a branch of Frederick Taylor that was incorporated in Hawaii but operated in California and recruited students internationally. It was closed by court order in Hawaii in 2001.

History[edit]

Frederick Taylor University was established in 1994 to cater to mature adult learners, 20 years or older.[1]

The University offers undergraduate and graduate distance education programs in business, leading to either a bachelors or master's degree.[2] Students can enroll at any time throughout the year.[3]

In 2012, the New York Times reported that it is located in an office building in Moraga where it occupies a "cramped office on the second floor".[4]

The institution lists six faculty members, led by Mansour S. Saki and his wife, Zhilla Nayeri Saki. Mansour Saki reports holding a Ph.D. from the CSM Institute of Graduate Studies, while Zhilla Saki reports a doctorate-level degree in business administration from the same school. According to the New York Times, CSM relinquished its accreditation in 2004. The Sakis' daughter, Maryam S. Boller, is also on the faculty.[4] Boller holds a bachelor's degree from University of California, Berkeley and a master's degree from the University of London.[5]

Frederick Taylor International University[edit]

Frederick Taylor International University, a branch of Frederick Taylor University, was incorporated in Hawaii but operated in California (with an address in Moraga[6]) and recruited students internationally in countries including India and China.[4] It was also headed by Mansour Saki. It was closed by court order in Hawaii in 2001 for several legal violations, including falsely claiming to hold a state license and failing to inform students that it lacked accreditation.[4][7]

Approval and accreditation status[edit]

Frederick Taylor University is approved to operate by the California Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education[8] and appears on the current California Postsecondary Education Commission list of state-approved institutions.[9][10] That authorization was from the California Bureau for Private Postsecondary and Vocational Education (BPPVE), a predecessor agency of the Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education.[10][11] BPPE conducted two site visits to FTU in May 2012 and April 2014[12]

FTU is not accredited by any accreditation body recognized by U.S. education authorities.[13] In 2012, Mansour Saki told a reporter that he did not intend to apply for accreditation from a recognized accreditation organization.[4]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Frederick Taylor University catalog (PDF)
  2. ^ Degree Programs, FTU website
  3. ^ Admissions and Enrollment, FTU website
  4. ^ a b c d e Jennifer Gollan (January 14, 2012). "California Leads Nation in Unaccredited Schools, and Enforcement Is Lax". New York Times. 
  5. ^ http://ftu.edu/faculty.htm
  6. ^ Frederick Taylor International University catalog, dated January 2002
  7. ^ See Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Institutions Whose Degrees are Illegal to Use in Texas and Hawaii Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs, Civil Enforcement Lawsuits: Frederick Taylor International University.
  8. ^ Approval, Frederick Taylor University
  9. ^ [1]
  10. ^ a b CPEC Listing for FTU
  11. ^ Frederick Taylor University website, Approval and Authority to Grant Degrees and FAQ Guide to California Colleges & Universities (accessed July 26, 2007)
  12. ^ "Compliance Inspection Results". Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  13. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-06-28. Retrieved 2009-11-07. 

External links[edit]