George D. Murray

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George Dominic Murray
VADM George D. Murray.jpg
Born (1889-07-06)July 6, 1889
Boston, Massachusetts
Died 18 June 1956(1956-06-18) (aged 66)
San Francisco, California
Place of burial Arlington National Cemetery
Allegiance  United States
Service/branch Seal of the United States Department of the Navy.svg United States Navy
Years of service 1910–1951
Rank US-O10 insignia.svg Admiral
Commands held First Fleet
USS Enterprise
Battles/wars World War I
World War II
Awards Navy Cross
Navy Distinguished Service Medal
Legion of Merit (2)[1]

George Dominic Murray (July 6, 1889 – June 18, 1956) was an Admiral in the United States Navy and early naval aviator.

Biography[edit]

Murray was born in Boston, Massachusetts, attended the U.S. Naval Academy, graduating in 1911 and became a naval aviator in 1915. During World War II, he commanded the aircraft carrier Enterprise (CV-6), from 21 March 1941 to 30 June 1942, which included the Doolittle Raid on Tokyo and the Battle of Midway.[2] At the end of the war, he was the commander of the Mariana Islands, and accepted the Japanese surrender of the Caroline Islands aboard his flagship, the cruiser Portland (CA-33).[3][4]

He commanded the First Fleet from August 1947 to August 1948.

He retired as a full Admiral in 1951, died in San Francisco, California on 18 June 1956, and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.[2]

In 1961, Murray was posthumously designated the third recipient of the Gray Eagle Award, as the most senior active naval aviator from 1947 until his retirement.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Military Times Hall of Valor : Awards for George Dominic Murray". militarytimes.com. Retrieved 11 October 2010. 
  2. ^ a b "George D. Murray". earlyaviators.com. Retrieved 11 October 2010. 
  3. ^ "Naval History : USS Portland (CA-33)". historycentral.com. Archived from the original on 12 October 2007. Retrieved 11 October 2010. 
  4. ^ "USS Portland - Surrender of Truk Atoll, 2 September 1945". ussportland.org. Retrieved 11 October 2010. 

External links[edit]