New Mexico Bank & Trust Building

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New Mexico Bank & Trust Building
Gold Building Albuquerque.jpg
Alternative names Bank of New Mexico Building
First Interstate Bank Building
Gold Building
Record height
Preceded by Simms Building
Surpassed by Bank of the West Tower
General information
Status Complete
Type Commercial offices
Architectural style Modernism
Location 320 Gold Avenue SW
Albuquerque, New Mexico
Coordinates 35°04′59″N 106°39′05″W / 35.083182°N 106.651452°W / 35.083182; -106.651452Coordinates: 35°04′59″N 106°39′05″W / 35.083182°N 106.651452°W / 35.083182; -106.651452
Construction started 1959
Completed 1961[1]
Cost $4 million[1]
Height
Roof 62 m (203 ft)
Technical details
Floor count 14
Floor area 108,000 sq ft (10,000 m2)[2]
Design and construction
Architect W.C. Kruger & Associates
References
[3][4][5]

The New Mexico Bank & Trust Building is a 14-story, 62 m (203 ft) office skyscraper on Gold Avenue in downtown Albuquerque, New Mexico. It is the sixth-tallest building in the city. When completed in 1961, it surpassed the Simms Building to become the tallest building in the state, and was itself surpassed by the Bank of the West Tower two years later.

The Bank of New Mexico Building, as it was originally known, was built in 1959–1961 on the site of the old Wright's Trading Post building at Fourth and Gold. The building was dedicated on January 16, 1961, in a ceremony featuring Native American dancers and a speech by a sombrero-wearing Winthrop Rockefeller, who was one of the original owners.

The building's main 12-story block has black tinted glass curtain walls on the north and south sides, while the windowless east and west sides and the protruding elevator shaft on the south side are faced with brick. It sits atop a larger one-story base, with a recessed second story in between. The architect was Willard C. Kruger.

History[edit]

The Bank of New Mexico Building, as it was originally known, was built in 1959–1961 by the Bank Realty Company, which had Winthrop Rockefeller as one of its main partners. Rockefeller was also one of the developers of Winrock Center and would later be elected governor of Arkansas. Built on a five-lot parcel at 4th Street and Gold Avenue, the building replaced several older structures including Wright's Trading Post.[6][7] It was dedicated on January 16, 1961, in a ceremony featuring Native American dancers and speeches by Rockefeller, dressed in a sombrero for the occasion, and Chairman of the City Commission Maurice Sanchez.[8] The project's total cost was about $4 million.[1]

Designed by local architect Willard C. Kruger, the 14-story building surpassed the Simms Building across the street to become the tallest in New Mexico. The 14th floor housed the private Petroleum Club, while the namesake Bank of New Mexico had its headquarters on the ground floor.[6] In 1981, the bank's holding company re-branded its banks with the First Interstate Bank name, and the building was renamed accordingly.[9] The building was given a $5 million remodeling in 1986, which included major mechanical work as well as replacing the original curtain walls with the current black tinted glass. Kruger & Associates were the architects for the remodeling as well, though Kruger himself had died in 1984.[10]

The bank headquarters eventually ended up in the hands of Norwest Bank, which moved out in 1994 as it already had headquarters nearby. In 1996, The Bank of New Mexico (unrelated to the original bank) moved in and put its name on the building,[9] but this bank was also acquired by Norwest two years later.[11] Since the early 2000s it has been the headquarters of New Mexico Bank & Trust.

Architecture[edit]

The New Mexico Bank & Trust Building is 203 feet (62 m) tall and has 14 above-ground floors plus a mechanical penthouse. It was designed by Willard C. Kruger, who was also the architect of the New Mexico State Capitol among other works. Stylistically, it fits into the International Style and is quite similar in appearance to the older Simms Building across the street. Like the Simms Building, it has curtain walls on the north and south sides, windowless brick on the east and west sides, a recessed second story exposing the structural columns, and a larger one-story base. The curtain walls were originally clear glass alternating with opaque turquoise-colored panels, but this was replaced by black tinted glass set in a coral-colored frame during the 1986 remodeling.[10] On the south side, the building has a protruding, brick-faced elevator shaft.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Brimberg, Judith (January 17, 1961). "500 persons attend new bank opening". Albuquerque Journal. Retrieved October 22, 2017 – via Newspapers.com. 
  2. ^ Moskos, Harry (August 15, 2004). "Where It's Happening". The Albuquerque Journal. NM. 
  3. ^ New Mexico Bank & Trust Building at Emporis
  4. ^ "New Mexico Bank & Trust Building". SkyscraperPage. 
  5. ^ New Mexico Bank & Trust Building at Structurae
  6. ^ a b Robinson, Sherry (September 22, 1986). "In 1961, new 'skyscraper' was tallest building in state". Albuquerque Journal. Retrieved October 22, 2017 – via Newspapers.com. 
  7. ^ Sonderman, Joe (2010). Route 66 in New Mexico. Charleston: Arcadia. p. 40. ISBN 0738580295. 
  8. ^ Johnson, Sam (January 16, 1961). "Indian Legends Are Chanted As Bank Building Dedicated". The Albuquerque Tribune. p. A1. 
  9. ^ a b Sieger, Maggie (August 5, 1996). "Building Comes Full Circle". The Albuquerque Journal. 
  10. ^ a b Robinson, Sherry (September 22, 1986). "Facelift costs First Interstate more than original building". Albuquerque Journal. Retrieved October 23, 2017 – via Newspapers.com. 
  11. ^ Baca, Aaron (March 12, 1998). "Buyout rumors prove true". Albuquerque Journal. Retrieved October 23, 2017 – via Newspapers.com. 

External links[edit]