Irwin Chanin

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Irwin Salmon Chanin
Born October 29, 1891
Bronx, New York
Died February 24, 1988(1988-02-24) (aged 39)
Nationality United States
Ethnicity Jewish
Education B.S. Cooper Union
Occupation real estate developer
Religion Judaism
Spouse(s) Sylvia Schofler
Children Doris Chanin Freedman
Family Henry Chanin (brother)

Irwin Salmon Chanin (29 October 1891 – 24 February 1988) was an American architect and real estate developer, best known for designing several Art Deco towers and Broadway theaters.

Biography[edit]

Chanin was born to a Jewish family, the son of an immigrant from Poland.[1] In 1915, he graduated from Cooper Union with a degree in civil engineering.[1] In 1919, he and his brother Henry founded the Chanin Construction Company.[1] In 1925, they built the 46th Street Theater, the first of six theaters built on Broadway.[1] In 1930, they built a twin-towered housing cooperative skyscraper named The Majestic and then The Century.[1] Other notable buildings include the Chanin Building, Richard Rodgers Theatre, the Lincoln Hotel (now Row NYC Hotel), the Beacon Hotel and Theater, and the World Apparel Center.[1]

Chanin was also known for starting the "Green Acres" section of Valley Stream, NY, which he never finished after World War II, only completing the "Old section" in the 1930s. He was President of Chanin Theatres Corporation, and his brother Henry I. Chanin was Treasurer.In 1981, Cooper Union renamed its school of architecture after him.[1]

Personal life[edit]

In 1921, Chanin married Sylvia Schofler; She died in 1976. They had one daughter, Doris Chanin Freedman, who died in 1981.[1] Chanin died on February 24, 1988. His funeral was held at the Stephen Wise Free Synagogue in Manhattan.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i David W. Dunlap (February 26, 1988). "Irwin Chanin, Builder of Theaters And Art Deco Towers, Dies at 96 (Obituary)". The New York Times. Retrieved June 21, 2011. 

External links[edit]