Karl Striedieck

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Karl H. Striedieck II (born April 7, 1937 in Ann Arbor, Michigan) is a world record setting glider pilot, a member of the U.S. Soaring Hall of Fame, and an active Holocaust denier. He was an early pioneer of ridge soaring in the Ridge-and-valley Appalachians in the 1960s, ultimately setting nine world records flying gliders there. He was selected for the U.S. national soaring team 12 times, and won a silver medal in the world championships in 1978 and 1983.

Striedieck was a U.S. Air Force pilot from 1959 to 1962, flying the F-86 Sabre and F-102 Delta Dagger, then continued his military service until 1981 in the Pennsylvania Air National Guard, where he transitioned to the A-7 Corsair II. A year before graduating from Pennsylvania State University in 1965, he started flying gliders when he and Bill Clark co-founded the Nittany Soaring Club, flying out of the former State College Air Depot. He has over 15,000 flying hours, with nearly half of that total in gliders.

Striedieck moved his home to the Eagle Field private airport on top of Bald Eagle Mountain, near State College, Pennsylvania in 1966, and now lives there with his second wife, Dr. Iris Mittendorf Striedieck.

As a child, Karl H. Striedieck was saved from drowning by his brother Daniel Striedieck. His brother later died when his sand cave collapsed.[1]

World gliding records[edit]

Source: Fédération Aéronautique Internationale [1]

Holocaust denial[edit]

Striedieck has been active in denying and minimizing the atrocities of Nazi Germany. Many of his Holocaust denying activities have taken place at Penn State University, close to his gliderport, Eagle Field. He has published advertisements in Penn State's The Daily Collegian questioning the use of gas chambers during the holocaust. He has also handed out pamphlets published by the Institute for Historical Review at Penn State University a few times a year, often during Jewish holidays.[2] Striedieck enrolled in a Holocaust History class at Penn State University, where he promoted Holocaust denier views.[3][4] His experience taking a Holocaust History class at Penn State University was the basis for an Institute for Historical Review article by Mark Weber, a former member of the Nazi National Alliance, and prominent Holocaust denier.[5] His Holocaust denying activities have resulted in debate regarding the appropriateness of Penn State University providing police protection for his expression of free speech, as well as the appropriateness of The Daily Collegian accepting paid Holocaust denying advertisements.[6]

Striedieck's Nazi-sympathizing activities have spilled over into his soaring life. This includes hosting Hanna Reitsch, Nazi Germany's most famous female aviator, at Eagle field in 1979.[7]

Striedieck grew up in a Nazi-sympathizing household. His father, Dr. Walter Striedieck, a German instructor at University of Michigan, visited Nazi Germany in 1937. Dr. Striedieck's presentation to Deutscher Verein was described in an article in The Michigan Daily. Dr. Striedieck reports "the majority of people seem wholeheartedly in favor of Hitler" and "although most Germans appear to favor Hitler, there are a good many under-cover Communists even in the ranks of the Storm Troopers."[8]

Other flying accomplishments[edit]

  • Smirnoff Derby Twice, won 1978
  • SSA Contest Rules Committee Chairman 1992–2004
  • Contest Organizer/Manager 18 times
  • Lilienthal Medal 1971
  • Lincoln Award 1986
  • Exceptional Achievement Award 1972, 1977, 1986, 1994, 1997
  • U.S. Standard Class Trophy 1973, 1980, 1981, 1992, 1996;
  • U.S. Schreder 15M Trophy 1977, 1980, 1983, 1987, 1989, 1996, 1999, 2001
  • Giltner Trophy 1988, 1989, 1993, 1999, 2001
  • Hilton Cup 1989
  • du Pont Trophy 1990
  • Kubly Standard Trophy 1991, 1992, 1993, 1990
  • Gomez Trophy 1999
  • Lattimore Trophy 1999
  • Hatcher Trophy 2001
  • FAI 1000 K Diploma #5 (Int #8) 1972
Source: Soaring Hall of Fame [2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "October 03, 1940 (vol. 51, iss. 4) - Image 1". Michigan Daily Digital Archives. Retrieved 2017-09-16.
  2. ^ Oakes, Amy. "Holocaust denier addresses students; placed revisionist ad last semester". The Daily Collegian. Retrieved 2017-09-16.
  3. ^ Narayana, Naina. "Revisionists challenge documented past". The Daily Collegian. Retrieved 2017-09-16.
  4. ^ "Professor Responds to Revisionist Question By Calling Police". www.ihr.org. Retrieved 2017-09-16.
  5. ^ "CFCA - The Coordination Forum for Countering Antisemitism". www.antisemitism.org.il. Retrieved 2017-09-17.
  6. ^ "Holocaust denial is a disease, learning is the only cure". The Daily Collegian. Retrieved 2017-09-16.
  7. ^ "Last Record" (PDF). Hangar Soaring. Women Soaring Pilots Association. February 2002.
  8. ^ "October 20, 1937 (vol. 48, iss. 21) - Image 1". Michigan Daily Digital Archives. Retrieved 2017-09-16.