Kinashut Kamuy

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Kinashut Kamuy is the Ainu kamuy (god) of snakes. He is a benevolent figure who is called upon for protection against various calamities.

Mythology[edit]

Kinashut Kamuy is depicted as generally benevolent and helpful to humans. He controls the behavior of snakes, protecting those who venerate him from their bites. In Ainu mythology, snake spirits are believed to possess people and cause a variety of ailments such as eye disease and paralysis, and Kinashut Kamuy is appealed to in order to exorcise these spirits from a victim. He also offers communities protection against other diseases, particularly typhoid.[1]

He is generally said to be the brother of Nusakoro Kamuy, but the two are sometimes regarded as a single entity.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Ashkenazy, Michael. Handbook of Japanese Mythology. Santa Barbara, California: ABC-Clio, 2003. 199

References[edit]

  • Ashkenazy, Michael. Handbook of Japanese Mythology. Santa Barbara, California: ABC-Clio, 2003.
  • Etter, Carl. Ainu Folklore: Traditions and Culture of the Vanishing Aborigines of Japan. Chicago: Wilcox and Follett, 1949.
  • Munro, Neil Gordon. Ainu Creed and Cult. New York: Columbia University Press, 1995.