List of northern resident orca pods

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This is a list of northern resident orca pods that live off the coast of British Columbia, Canada as of March 2013.[1] The Northern resident community is found in coastal waters ranging from mid-Vancouver Island north to the Queen Charlotte Islands and southeastern Alaska. Northern residents live in close-knit family groups known as pods that frequently split into subpods during the winter months and feed only on fish. They have never been seen spending time with other communities, although their territories often overlap.

Pods[edit]

Population of Orcas that live of British Columbia.[2]

Pod Matrilines Individuals Notable members Notes
A Clan
A1 3 20 Stubbs (A1)*, Nicola (A2)*, Tsitika (A30)* See main article
A4 3 15 Yakat (A11)*, Kelsy (A24), Siwiti (A48)*, Springer (A73) See main article
A5 3 10 Top Notch (A5)*, Eve (A9)*, Sharky (A25)*, Corky (A16) See main article
B1 1 6 Hooker (B1)* Used to have a large proportion of males
C1 2 16 Namu (C1)* Its two matrilines most often travel separately
D1 2 12 Wrap Fin (D1)* Its two matrilines are most often encountered together
H1 1 5 Has been encountered infrequently
I1 1 18 Has been encountered very infrequently
I2 1 3 Has been encountered very infrequently
I18 2 24
G Clan
G1 4 34
G12 2 16
I11 2 26
I31 2 10
R Clan
R1 4 38 Spans a record five generations
W1 1 1 Will eventually die out as there is no reproductive female.

Asterisk indicates deceased member.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Morton, Alexandra (2002). Listening to whales : what the orcas have taught us (First ed.). New York: Ballantine Books. ISBN 0-345-44288-1.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ford, John K. B.; Ellis, Graeme M.; Balcomb, Kenneth C. (1996). Killer Whales: The Natural History and Genealogy of Orcinus Orca in British Columbia and Washington. UBC Press. pp. 45–47. ISBN 978-0-7748-4430-7.
  2. ^ Hoyt, Erich (1990). Orca, the whale called killer (New ed.). Camden East, Ont.: Camden House. p. 222. ISBN 0-920656-25-0.