Now You See It (UK game show)

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Now You See It
Created by Frank Wayne
Starring

Johnny Beattie (1981–4)
Jack McLaughlin (1985–6)

Marion Kirkwood

Grant Stott (Celebrity version)
Fred MacAulay (Children's version)
Narrated by Steve Hamilton
Country of origin Scotland
Original language(s) English
Production
Running time 30mins (inc. adverts)
Production company(s) Goodson-Todman Productions
Distributor FremantleMedia
Release
Original network Scottish Television
Picture format 4:3
Original release 5 January 1981 (1981-01-05) – August 1995 (1995-08)
Chronology
Related shows Now You See It (U.S. version)

Now You See It was a Scottish television game show that aired mostly in Scotland throughout its run. It was shown to a lesser degree across some of the ITV Network. It was based upon the U.S. version of the show and used the US show's theme music.

Format[edit]

The game was centred on four contestants competing in a word search game mixed with trivia. The host asked questions and contestants buzzed in and searched for the answer on the board. Contestants would guess the line where the correct answer appeared and then the position as well as the answer. Points were awarded for correct answers, based on the line number added or multiplied by the position number. Example: Line 3 + Position 7 = 10 points or Line 3 x Position 7 = 21 points.

When time was up, the three highest-scoring players entered the "Cryptic" round. In this round, the answers appeared one letter at a time and the contestants were given a clue to each word. The first two players with four correct answers would advance to round three, which had the same format as the first round.

By 1985, the winner won £500 and played a solo round in which all of the correct answers fit a given category. The player must correctly answer seven out of twelve questions in order to win a mystery star prize. The solo round was also played on the children's versions in the 1990s.

Prizes[edit]

For first two series, the winner's prize was £100. In series 3, the prizes were increased to £400 for the winner and £100 for the runner up. By 1985, the winner won £500, the first runner-up won £100, and the player eliminated in the second round £50. All contestants were give an engraved crystal decanter and four glasses. For the celebrity and children's versions, but no money was earned but Prizes were awarded instead.

Transmissions[edit]

Series 2 was broadcast to the rest of the ITV companies over the Summer Wednesday afternoons 1 July until 26 August. STV broadcast the episodes on Thursday evening around 19.00. The following seven series were only broadcast on Scottish Television, and continued to be very popular on Scottish television, with Two celebrity versions were also produced in 1985 and 1986.

The ITV network picked up the series again in 1985 with Series 10 and 12 being broadcast on Sunday teatime, or Friday afternoon slot at 17.15, Series 11 was only broadcast in the Scottish Television region. Scottish replaced Now You See It with Split Second in 1987 and Wheel of Fortune in 1988 with the later being Scottish Television's prime time game show for the ITV network, which lasted for a much longer run at a national level.

Original series[edit]

Series Start date End date Episodes
1
5 January 1981
30 March 1981
13[1]
2
2 July 1981
24 September 1981
13[1]
3
14 January 1982
1 April 1982
12[1]
4
16 September 1982
30 December 1982
16[1]
5
17 May 1983
9 August 1983
13[1]
6
27 September 1983
20 December 1983
13[1]
7
12 January 1984
19 April 1984
14[1]
8
26 July 1984
11 October 1984
12[1]
9
2 January 1985
12 April 1985
15[1]
10
28 April 1985
21 July 1985
13[1]
11
1 January 1986
21 March 1986
10[1]
12
13 April 1986
27 July 1986
13[1]

Celebrity series[edit]

Series Start date End date Episodes
1
1993
1993
??

Kids series[edit]

Series Start date End date Episodes
1
11 July 1994
August 1995
??

Trivia[edit]

The original Now You See It studio set was also used for the celebrity panel show Funny You Should Say That – also hosted by McLaughlin – which aired between 1984 and 1985. The only difference being that the electronic game board was not used.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Evening Times". Retrieved 15 October 2012. 

External links[edit]