Nipro Hachiko Dome

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Odate Jukai Dome)
Jump to: navigation, search
Nipro Hachiko Dome
Odate Jukai Dome1.JPG
The Ōdate Jukai Dome
Full name Ōdate Jukai Dome
Location Odate, Akita, Japan
Coordinates 40°17′32.7″N 140°35′12.7″E / 40.292417°N 140.586861°E / 40.292417; 140.586861Coordinates: 40°17′32.7″N 140°35′12.7″E / 40.292417°N 140.586861°E / 40.292417; 140.586861
Public transit Ōdate Station
Capacity 15,000
Construction
Opened June 1997
General contractor Takenaka Corporation

The Nipro Hachiko Dome (ニプロハチ公ドーム, Nipuro Hachikou Dōmu) is a large wooden stadium in Ōdate, Akita, in the north of Japan. The stadium covers an area of 12,915 m2.[1] It was completed in June 1997 and is made from 25,000 Akita Cypress trees which are covered with a special double Teflon-coated membrane. This allows enough sunlight into the stadium so that during the day no artificial lights are needed.[2] The stadium is principally used for baseball games,[3] but thanks in part to its removable grandstands, the stadium can also be used for other sports and events.[4]

Structure[edit]

Interior view

The roof was made from 25,000 Akita Cypress trees which were aged over the course of 60 years.[4] This wooden framework is covered with a special double Teflon-coated membrane made from translucent fluorethylene resin-coated fibreglass.[5] This membrane is very strong and light. The stadium is location in a region of Japan that it subjected to heavy snowfall of 2 to 3 m (6.6 to 9.8 ft). Because of this, the dome itself also has an aerodynamic design to resist strong winds and heavy snowfall.[2] Buildup of snow on the roof is prevented by circulating warm air between the 2 Teflon-coated membranes, this shakes off the snow and allows the stadium to be used in all weathers.[4]

Statistics[edit]

  • Area: 12,915 m2[1]
  • Total floor area: 24,672 m2[1]
  • Height: 52 m (171 ft)
  • Ceiling clearance: 46.2 m (152 ft)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c 施設概要 [Overview of facilities] (in Japanese). City of Odate. Retrieved 2014-06-08. 
  2. ^ a b "Toyo Ito's Daylit Odate Dome Shrugs Off Snowstorms and Monsoons in Japan Toyo Ito's levitating Odate Dome - Gallery Page 2 – Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building". inhabitat.com. Retrieved 2014-06-07. 
  3. ^ Works: The ones to beat 2006,, CMP Information Ltd, Tonbridge.
  4. ^ a b c "Japan Atlas: Odate Jukai Dome". web-japan.org. Retrieved 2014-06-07. 
  5. ^ "The ones to beat.(Works)(Brief Article) | HighBeam Business: Arrive Prepared". business.highbeam.com. Retrieved 2014-06-07. 

External links[edit]