Poor White Trash

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Poor White Trash (film))
Jump to: navigation, search
For other uses, see White trash (disambiguation).
Poor White Trash
PoorWhiteTrash.jpg
DVD Cover for the movie
Directed by Michael Addis
Produced by Lorena David
Written by Michael Addis
Tony Urban
Starring Sean Young
Tony Denman
Patrick Renna
Jacob Tierney
Jaime Pressley
Jason London
Danielle Harris
M. Emmet Walsh
Tim Kazurinsky
Dylan Lipe
Music by Tree Adams
Distributed by Hollywood Independents
Xenon Entertainment Group
Release date
June 16th 2000
Running time
89 minutes
Country United States
Language English

Poor White Trash is a crime-comedy film directed by Michael Addis. The film was released on June 16, 2000 and was distributed by jointly by Hollywood Independents and Xenon Group. The film stars an ensemble cast of actors, including Jaime Pressly and others, most of them before they became famous.

Plot[edit]

Mike Bronco believes a degree from Southern Illinois University Carbondale is a ticket out of life in a trailer park. He is determined to rise above his humble southern Illinois roots and broken home to become a clinical family therapist. His best friend Lynard "Lennie" Lake, has a simpler vision for the future. He is a firecracker enthusiast whose notion of the American dream is trucking school.

One day, fun-loving Lennie convinces the serious-minded Mike to shoplift "Near Beer" and enjoy a carefree afternoon of kicking back. The seemingly harmless exploit snowballs into an exploding Vega (an ill-conceived distraction), injuring store owner Ken Kenworthy and enraging his aggressive son, Rickey. The two offenders land in Jackson County Court and Mike's dreams of an exodus to the middle class and Lenny's trucking career are threatened. As this transpires, Mike's mother, Linda Bronco finds she has plenty to contemplate beyond paying rent. She still grapples with how her youthful indiscretions cost her a career in nursing; her would-be Pro-Wrestler husband, Jim, abruptly leaves and she loses her job at a local nursing home. Although her life's burdens hit Linda hard, Hell will freeze over before she allows the worst to befall Mike and Lenny. Even with no money at their disposal, the Broncos and Lennie believe at first that it will take a competent, sober lawyer to keep Mike's record clean and college-ready.

Next, the boys devise an ironic solution: a few trailer burglaries to raise the money to hire lawyer Ron Lake, Lennie's oily, turquoise-laden, ex-con grandfather, to take their case. When Linda catches the boys in the middle of a burglary, she steadfastly resolves to help them out, provided their spoils will finance Mike's college tuition. As the situation grows more desperate, the boy's worst fears are realized when Linda's twenty-something boyfriend to come along for the ride. The boyfriend, Brian Ross, is the town sheriff's son and a former high school football star and bully. As if it were not bad enough that Brian resumed tormenting and menacing Mike and Lenny, his ceaseless passion for ex-flame Sandy Lake complicates their already-complex plan. Sandy, who just happens to be Ron's post-adolescent trophy wife (and Lennie's step-Grandmother to boot), has bad intentions in mind for the boys. She sees their predicament as an easy opportunity to launch her own manipulative agenda.

During their bizarre journey to redemption and the promise of a better life, the boys throw all caution and common sense to the wind. With Mike's mom in tow, they execute a series of outrageously-plotted trailer park burglaries. With bigger threats and growing confidence, the boys move on to bigger hits at the nursing home and a fast food restaurant. Then things really spin out of control with several repeat visits to court, massive explosions, guns, fire and, to top it all off, a spectacular car/trailer chase with $250,000 in loot at stake. Not surprisingly, they are also hurled into the paths of Sunrise, Illinois most colorful characters including Suzi and Suzy, a pair of damaged-but-lovable townies, the crusty and outspoken Judge Pike, Carlton Rasmeth, an inept alcoholic defense counselor and Machado, an ambitious right wing prosecutor not to mention a host of good ole boys and girls who have various plans for Mike and Lenny that have nothing to do with higher education.

Despite the insanity, Mike and Lennie learn significant growing-up lessons in the most hilarious ways. While they tear through the highways, cornfields and courthouses of America's heartland, their bonds of friendship and trust grow stronger. Through zany trials and instances of mistaken identity, they endure many indignities, life-threatening situations, temptations and embarrassments. But they survive, determined to emerge with dignity, self-respect and an unyielding sense of humor.

Cast[edit]

  • Tony Denman as Mike Bronco
  • Sean Young as Linda Bronco, Mike’s mother
  • Bob Koherr as Jim Bronco, Mike’s father
  • Jacob Tierney as Lynard "Lennie" Lake, Mike’s best friend
  • William Devane as Ron Lake, Lennie’s Grandfather
  • Jaime Pressly as Sandy Lake, Ron’s wife
  • M. Emmet Walsh as Judge Pike
  • Tim Kazurinsky as Carlton Rasmeth, an inept defense attorney
  • Richard Livingston as Prosecutor Machado
  • Charles Solomon Jr. as Bailiff
  • Doug MacHugh as Sheriff Ross
  • Todd Babcock as Deputy Haggard
  • Fred Belford as Officer Landaur
  • Michael Addis as Officer White
  • Jason London as Brian Ross, the Sheriff’s son
  • Craig Patton as Ken Kenworthy
  • Patrick Renna as Rickey Kenworthy, Ken’s son
  • Danielle Harris as Suzi
  • Kerri Randles as Suzy
  • Jacques Remy as McNeeley
  • Tim Mattingly was an uncredited extra (Truck driving school scene)
  • Christian Coogan wan an uncredited extra (Truck driving school scene)

Dylan Lipe was an uncredited extra (Bowling Alley Scene)

Reception[edit]

On the film review aggregate site Rotten Tomatoes, the film holds a 56% "Rotten" score. The consensus was that Poor White Trash was "silly and over-the-top, but not very funny."

On the film review aggregate site Metacritic, the film currently stands with a 23/100 score or equal to 23% based on 4 professional reviews. According to the site, that score falls into the "Generally Unfavorable Reviews" category. The best review (40% or 4 out of 10) on the site is from Luke Y. Thompson of New Times LA, who wrote that "Hilarity should ensue, but doesn't." The worst review (6% or 6 out of 100) comes from Kevin Maynard of Mr. Showbiz, who wrote that he'd "rather go on an all crisco diet than sit through PWT again". However, reader reviews are more favorable as it has two reviews with an average reader grade of 10/10.

On the film review site AllMovie there is no written review but it has been scored by the site, receiving two stars out of five.

External links[edit]