Sa'ar 3-class missile boat

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Saar3.gif
Class overview
Name: Sa'ar 3
Builders: Constructions Mécaniques de Normandie
Operators:  Israeli Navy
Preceded by: Sa'ar 2-class missile boat
Succeeded by: Sa'ar 4-class missile boat
In commission: 1969-1991
Completed: 6
General characteristics
Type: Missile boat
Displacement: 220 tons (250 tons loaded)
Length: 45 m (148 ft)
Beam: 7.62 m (25.0 ft)
Draft: 1.8 m (5.9 ft)
Propulsion: 4 MTU 16V 538 diesel engines, four shafts, total of 12,800 hp (9,500 kW)
Speed: 40 knots (74 km/h)
Range:

2,500 nmi (4,600 km) at 15 kn (28 km/h)

1,000 nmi (1,900 km) at 30 kn (56 km/h)
Complement: 40 officers and crewmen
Sensors and
processing systems:
Armament:

Sa'ar 3 class ("Cherbourg") is a class of missile boats built in Cherbourg, France at the Amiot Shipyard based on Israeli Navy modification of the German Navy's Jaguar class fast attack craft. They are also known as the stars of Cherbourg.

Design and development[edit]

The Israeli naval command had reached the conclusion by the early 1960s that their old Second World War-era destroyers, frigates and corvettes were obsolete and new ships and vessels were needed.[3] Yitzhak Shoshan, later to command the destroyer INS Eilat at the time of her sinking, surveyed the available torpedo boat designs and recommended the German Jaguar-class.[4] The Israeli Navy asked Lürssen, the shipyard which built the Jaguar-class, to modify the wooden Jaguar-class design by switching to steel construction, adding 2.4 meters to the length, and revising the internal compartmentalization.[5] Due to Arab League pressure on the German government, this plan was not continued and a new builder was sought.[6] The Israeli Navy discovered that the Cherbourg-based Constructions Mécaniques de Normandie owned by Félix Amiot had experience building patrol boats in cooperation with Lürssen and would build the boats, based upon the German designs and plans.[7] The engines were imported from Germany.[8] The project received the codename "Falling Leaves" (Hebrew: שלכת‎‎).[9]

Operational history[edit]

Sa'ar 3 boats' first battle engagements were made during the October 1973 Yom Kippur War. During this war, the first surface to surface missile naval engagements took place. The first was at the Battle of Latakia where the Israeli Navy defeated Syrian boats and coastal targets using their guns and missiles. This was followed shortly thereafter by Israeli defeat of Egyptian forces at the Battle of Baltim.[10]

Boats in the class[edit]

  • INS Sa'ar (Tempest)
  • INS Sufa (Storm)
  • INS Ga'ash (Volcanic Storm)
  • INS Herev (Sword)
  • INS Hanit (Spear)
  • INS Hetz (Arrow)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Norman Friedman, The Naval Institute Guide to World Naval Weapon Systems Naval Institute Press, Anapolis, MD, 1989, ISBN 1-55750-262-5, p. 230.
  2. ^ Norman Friedman, The Naval Institute Guide to World Naval Weapons Systems, 1997-1998 Naval Institute Press, Anapolis, MD, 1979, ISBN 1-55750-268-4, p. 304.
  3. ^ Rabinovich, Abraham, The Boats of Cherbourg Henry Holt and Co., New York, NY, 1988, ISBN 0-8050-0680-X, pp. 23-27.
  4. ^ Rabinovich, Abraham, The Boats of Cherbourg Henry Holt and Co., New York, NY, 1988, ISBN 0-8050-0680-X, p. 35.
  5. ^ Rabinovich, Abraham, The Boats of Cherbourg Henry Holt and Co., New York, NY, 1988, ISBN 0-8050-0680-X, pp. 47-48.
  6. ^ Rabinovich, Abraham, The Boats of Cherbourg Henry Holt and Co., New York, NY, 1988, ISBN 0-8050-0680-X, p. 61.
  7. ^ Rabinovich, Abraham, The Boats of Cherbourg Henry Holt and Co., New York, NY, 1988, ISBN 0-8050-0680-X, pp. 62-63.
  8. ^ Rabinovich, Abraham, The Boats of Cherbourg Henry Holt and Co., New York, NY, 1988, ISBN 0-8050-0680-X, p. 18.
  9. ^ Rabinovich, Abraham, The Boats of Cherbourg Henry Holt and Co., New York, NY, 1988, ISBN 0-8050-0680-X, p. 56.
  10. ^ Rabinovich (1988), pp. 256-262

Bibliography[edit]

  • Rabinovich, Abraham (1988). The Boats of Cherbourg: The Secret Israeli Operation That Revolutionized Naval Warfare (1st ed.). New York: Seaver Books. ISBN 978-0-8050-0680-3.