Scars of the Soul Are Why Kids Wear Bandages When They Don't Have Bruises

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Scars of the Soul Are Why Kids Wear Bandages When They Don't Have Bruises
Author Miles Marshall Lewis
Country United States
Language English
Publisher Akashic Books
Pages 197
ISBN 978-1-888451-71-9

Scars of the Soul Are Why Kids Wear Bandages When They Don't Have Bruises is a 2004 collection of essays by Miles Marshall Lewis.[1] It was published by Akashic Books.[2]

Contents[edit]

I. Memory Lanes, Gun Hill Roads
  • Bronx Science
  • Famous Negro Writer #77
  • The Suckerpunch of My Childhood Files
  • Mama's Gun
  • Worldwide Underground
II. The Def of Hiphop
  • Peace, Unity, Love, Having Fun
  • Notes Toward a Hiphop Politick
    • Appeared first in 2003 in The Nation under the title "Russell Simmons's Rap."
  • Spelmo Babies and Other Bourgeois Ephemera
    • Appeared first in 1997 in LA Weekly under the title "All About the Benjamins."
  • Go Make of All Disciples
  • Scars of the Soul Are Why Kids Wear Bandages When They Don't Have Bruises
  • Another Great Day in Harlem
    • Appeared first in 1998 in XXL under the title "Hip-Hop America."

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pride, Felicia (November 9, 2004). "Scars of the Soul Are Why Kids Wear Bandages When They Don't Have Bruises by Miles Marshall Lewis". PopMatters. Retrieved May 4, 2015. 
  2. ^ Green, Tony (January 9, 2005). "Rap Sheets". The Washington Post. Retrieved May 4, 2015.