Short track speed skating at the 2010 Winter Olympics – Men's 1500 metres

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Men's 1500 metres
at the XXI Olympic Winter Games
Short track speed skating pictogram.svg
Venue Pacific Coliseum
Dates February 13
Competitors 36 from 16 nations
Winning time 2:17.611
Medalists
1st, gold medalist(s) Lee Jung-su  South Korea
2nd, silver medalist(s) Apolo Anton Ohno  United States
3rd, bronze medalist(s) J. R. Celski  United States
← 2006
2014 →
Short track speed skating at the 2010 Winter Olympics
Short track speed skating pictogram.svg
500 m   men   women
1000 m men women
1500 m men women
3000 m relay women
5000 m relay men

The men's 1500 metres in short track speed skating at the 2010 Winter Olympics took place on February 13 at the Pacific Coliseum. Heats took place at 5:00 PM PST, while the semifinals took place at 6:18 PM PST and the final event one hour later at 7:18 PM PST.

Preview[edit]

Going into the competition, speculation about possible winners focused on the strong South Korean contingent and on American skater Apolo Ohno. The South Korean team dominated short track speed skating at the 2006 Winter Olympics, winning six gold, three silver, and two bronze medals in the eight events. Their team at the 2010 games also included a number of skaters who were reigning world champions.[1] Ohno received significant media attention both because of previous successes at the 2002 Winter Olympics and 2006 Games and because he was in a position to break two records, the most medals won by a short track speed skater, and the most medals won by any winter Olympian from the United States.[2]

Qualifying heats[edit]

Following the semifinal round, seven skaters qualified for the final medal round: Lee Jung-su, Lee Ho-suk and Sung Si-bak of South Korea, Apolo Ohno and J. R. Celski of the United States, Liang Wenhao of China, and Olivier Jean of Canada. Jean actually placed seventh in his semifinal heat, but advanced to the medal race after judges ruled that he had been interfered with during the race.[3]

Final heat and results[edit]

Apolo Ohno, who became the most medaled short track speed skater in Olympic history after winning the silver in the men's 1500 m race in Vancouver.

The South Korean skaters and Ohno jostled for the lead during much of the race, switching the lead positions multiple times. Entering the final lap, the three South Koreans had passed Ohno and were in a position to sweep the medals in the event. However, at the entrance of the last corner on the final lap, Lee Ho-suk made a last-minute daring inside pass on Sung Si-bak, only to have his blade collide with Si-bak to cause both skaters to fall and slam into the barriers. This allowed Ohno and his fellow American skater J. R. Celski to move into second and third positions behind the eventual winner, Lee Jung-su. Lee Ho-suk was later disqualified by judges for causing the crash, and Sung Si-bak took fifth place.[4]

Following the race, gold medalist Lee Jung-su told the media that he did not feel good about his win because of his teammates' misfortune. He credited his win to a decision to start the race in the front of the pack, which was not his usual technique. With his second place finish and his sixth medal, Ohno became the most medaled short track speed skater in Olympic history, and tied Bonnie Blair's record as the most medaled American winter Olympian. Celski, who was skating after recovering from an accident the previous fall in which a skate's blade had sliced into his leg, earned his first medal.[4]

Haralds Silovs became the first athlete in Olympic history to participate in both short track and long track (5000 m) speed skating, and the first to compete in two different disciplines on the same day. He competed in the 5000 m and then raced across town to the 1500 m event.[5][6][7][8][9]

Results[edit]

Heats[edit]

Rank Heat Name Country Time Notes
1 1 Olivier Jean  Canada 2:14.279 Q
2 1 Lee Ho-suk  South Korea 2:14.324 Q
3 1 Liu Xianwei  China 2:14.354 Q
4 1 Tyson Heung  Germany 2:14.461
5 1 Blake Skjellerup  New Zealand 2:14.730
6 1 Ruslan Zakharov  Russia 2:14.929
1 2 Liang Wenhao  China 2:16.152 Q
2 2 Charles Hamelin  Canada 2:16.153 Q
3 2 Sebastian Praus  Germany 2:17.058 Q
4 2 Nicolas Bean  Italy 2:17.089
5 2 Jumpei Yoshizawa  Japan 2:30.701 ADV
2 Jordan Malone  United States DSQ
1 3 Lee Jung-su  South Korea 2:12.380 Q
2 3 J. R. Celski  United States 2:12.460 Q
3 3 Nicola Rodigari  Italy 2:12.609 Q
4 3 Benjamin Macé  France 2:12.875
5 3 Yuzo Takamido  Japan 2:15.402
6 3 Paul Herrmann  Germany 2:16.782
1 4 Yuri Confortola  Italy 2:14.584 Q
2 4 Sjinkie Knegt  Netherlands 2:14.862 Q
3 4 Jack Whelbourne  Great Britain 2:14.972 Q
4 4 Semion Elistratov  Russia 2:15.455
5 4 Viktor Knoch  Hungary 2:16.826
6 4 Song Weilong  China 2:20.095
1 5 Apolo Anton Ohno  United States 2:17.653 Q
2 5 Pieter Gysel  Belgium 2:18.560 Q
3 5 Peter Darazs  Hungary 2:18.827 Q
4 5 Jakub Jaworski  Poland 2:19.163
5 5 Jean Charles Mattei  France 2:33.989 ADV
5 Guillaume Bastille  Canada DSQ
1 6 Sung Si-bak  South Korea 2:14.836 Q
2 6 Haralds Silovs  Latvia 2:14.900 Q
3 6 Takahiro Fujimoto  Japan 2:16.155 Q
4 6 Anthony Douglas  Great Britain 2:16.622
5 6 Niels Kerstholt  Netherlands 2:46.222 ADV
6 Maxime Chataignier  France DSQ

Semifinals[edit]

Rank Heat Name Country Time Notes
1 1 Lee Jung-su  South Korea 2:10.949 QA, OR
2 1 Apolo Ohno  United States 2:11.072 QA
3 1 Charles Hamelin  Canada 2:11.225 QB
4 1 Nicola Rodigari  Italy 2:11.402 QB
5 1 Sjinkie Knegt  Netherlands 2:13.870
6 1 Jumpei Yoshizawa  Japan 2:15.129
7 1 Peter Darazs  Hungary 2:18.349
1 2 Lee Ho-suk  South Korea 2:14.833 QA
2 2 Liang Wenhao  China 2:15.453 QA
3 2 Sebastian Praus  Germany 2:16.240 QB
4 2 Pieter Gysel  Belgium 2:16.249 QB
5 2 Jack Whelbourne  Great Britain 2:17.156
6 2 Olivier Jean  Canada 2:32.358 ADV
7 2 Jean Charles Mattei  France 2:36.291
1 3 Sung Si-bak  South Korea 2:13.585 QA
2 3 J. R. Celski  United States 2:13.606 QA
3 3 Yuri Confortola  Italy 2:13.645 QB
4 3 Haralds Silovs  Latvia 2:14.009 QB
5 3 Liu Xianwei  China 2:14.500
6 3 Takahiro Fujimoto  Japan 2:15.984
7 3 Niels Kerstholt  Netherlands 2:16.352

Finals[edit]

Final B (classification round)[edit]

Rank Name Country Time Notes
7 Charles Hamelin  Canada 2:18.243
8 Nicola Rodigari  Italy 2:18.422
9 Pieter Gysel  Belgium 2:18.773
10 Haralds Silovs  Latvia 2:19.435
11 Sebastian Praus  Germany 2:20.374
Yuri Confortola  Italy DSQ

Final A (medal round)[edit]

Rank Name Country Time Notes
1st, gold medalist(s) Lee Jung-su  South Korea 2:17.611
2nd, silver medalist(s) Apolo Anton Ohno  United States 2:17.976
3rd, bronze medalist(s) J. R. Celski  United States 2:18.053
4 Olivier Jean  Canada 2:18.806
5 Sung Si-bak  South Korea 2:45.010
6 Liang Wenhao  China 2:48.192
Lee Ho-suk  South Korea DSQ

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Short Track Speed Skating: South Korea aim to tighten golden stranglehold". Agence France-Presse. Vancouver 2010. 2010-02-09. Retrieved 2010-02-14. 
  2. ^ "Short Track Speed Skating: Ohno on track for history books". Agence France-Presse. Vancouver 2010. 2010-02-09. Retrieved 2010-02-14. 
  3. ^ "Men's 1500 m - Semifinals". Short Track. Vancouver 2010. 2010-02-13. Retrieved 2010-02-14. 
  4. ^ a b "Short Track Speed Skating: Korea's Lee wins 1,500m short-track gold". Agence France-Presse. Vancouver 2010. 2010-02-13. Retrieved 2010-02-14. 
  5. ^ Toronto Star, "Latvia's quick-change artist makes Olympic history", 14 February 2010 (accessed 18 February 2010).
  6. ^ Washington Post, "Latvian speedskater is 1st to do double duty", Beth Harris, 13 February 2010 (accessed 18 February 2010).
  7. ^ New York Times, "From Long Track to Short Track, an Unprecedented Journey", Karen Crouse, 13 February 2010 (accessed 18 February 2010.)
  8. ^ CTV Olympics, "Latvian skater makes Olympic history", Agence France Press, 14 February 2010 (accessed 18 February 2010) Archived 9 March 2010 at the Wayback Machine..
  9. ^ New York Times, "Crosstown Ride to a Speedskating First", Associated Press, 30 January 2010 (accessed 18 February 2010).

External links[edit]