Sins that cry to heaven

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The Great Day of His Wrath, an 1851–1853 oil painting on canvas by the English painter John Martin.

The sins that cry to Heaven for Vengeance (Latin: peccata clamantia, lit. "screaming sins") are a list of certain mortal sins referenced in the Christian Bible for which God will deliver his justice.[1]

The expression is referenced in the Christian Bible, particularly in Genesis 4:10 ("The Lord said to Cain ... the voice of thy brother's blood crieth to me from the earth"), Genesis 18:20-21, Exodus 22:21-23, and Deuteronomy 24:14-15.[1] The sins are numbered either as being four or being seven; they are listed as follows:[2][3]

  • The "blood of Abel": homicide, abortion, infanticide, fratricide, patricide, and matricide[4]
  • The "sin of the Sodomites" (cf. Jude 1:7).[5][3]
  • The "cry of the people oppressed in Egypt, the cry of the foreigner, the widow, and the orphan": slavery, neglect, bigotry, or marginalization.[6][3]
  • The "injustice to the wage earner": taking advantage of and defrauding workers (cf. James 5:4).[7][3]

Tom Hoopes of Benedictine College explicates the sins that cry to heaven for vengeance with respect to modern political thought:[3]

The first two “sins that cry to heaven” include sins that one brand of politics downplays. First is abortion, which St. John Paul II compared to “the blood of Abel.” Second is the “sin of the Sodomites,” which the New Testament defines this way: “Sodom and Gomorrah and the surrounding towns gave themselves up to sexual immorality and perversion” (Jude 1:7). The second two sins are those that another brand of politics downplays: First, the plight of refugees, immigrants and those who need social assistance and, second, “injustice to the wage earner.” The Catechism cites the New Testament to explain what kind of “wage earner” it means: “Behold, the wages you withheld from the workers who harvested your fields are crying aloud, and the cries of the harvesters have reached the ears of the Lord of hosts” (James 5:4).[3]

The seven deadly sins, along with the sins against the Holy Ghost and the sins that cry to Heaven for vengeance, are considered especially serious in the Western Christian traditions.[8] The sins that cry to Heaven for Vengeance are referenced in the Douay Catholic Catechism of 1649, a compendium of Christian doctrine.[9] The concept is particularly important in Catholic moral theology.[10]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Mirus, Jeff (7 September 2004). "Crying to Heaven for Vengeance". Catholic Culture. Retrieved 21 May 2019. The Bible mentions only four sins which cry out to God for vengeance.
  2. ^ Waldrop, Robert (2006). "The War on Immigrants". Saint Oscar Romero Catholic Worker Community. Retrieved 21 May 2019. According to the Catechism of the Catholic Church, injustice to immigrants is one of seven sins that "cry to heaven". It is ranked with murder of the innocent in its gravity: "1867 The catechism plainly states that there are "sins that cry to heaven": the blood of Abel, the sin of the Sodomites, the cry of the people oppressed in Egypt, the cry of the foreigner, the widow, and the orphan, injustice to the wage earner."
  3. ^ a b c d e f Hoopes, Tom (10 September 2017). "Jesus Says: Listen to the Church". National Catholic Register. Retrieved 19 May 2019. That is quite a list. The first two “sins that cry to heaven” include sins that one brand of politics downplays. First is abortion, which St. John Paul II compared to “the blood of Abel.” Second is the “sin of the Sodomites,” which the New Testament defines this way: “Sodom and Gomorrah and the surrounding towns gave themselves up to sexual immorality and perversion” (Jude 1:7). The second two sins are those that another brand of politics downplays: First, the plight of refugees, immigrants and those who need social assistance and, second, “injustice to the wage earner.” The Catechism cites the New Testament to explain what kind of “wage earner” it means: “Behold, the wages you withheld from the workers who harvested your fields are crying aloud, and the cries of the harvesters have reached the ears of the Lord of hosts” (James 5:4).
  4. ^ Catechism 2268 The fifth commandment forbids direct and intentional killing as gravely sinful. the murderer and those who cooperate voluntarily in murder commit a sin that cries out to heaven for vengeance. Infanticide, fratricide, parricide, and the murder of a spouse are especially grave crimes by reason of the natural bonds which they break. Concern for eugenics or public health cannot justify any murder, even if commanded by public authority.
  5. ^ Genesis 19:5 - 13
  6. ^ Catechism 2448 "In its various forms - material deprivation, unjust oppression, physical and psychological illness and death - human misery is the obvious sign of the inherited condition of frailty and need for salvation in which man finds himself as a consequence of original sin. This misery elicited the compassion of Christ the Savior, who willingly took it upon himself and identified himself with the least of his brethren. Hence, those who are oppressed by poverty are the object of a preferential love on the part of the Church which, since her origin and in spite of the failings of many of her members, has not ceased to work for their relief, defense, and liberation through numerous works of charity which remain indispensable always and everywhere."
  7. ^ Catechism 2434 A just wage is the legitimate fruit of work. To refuse or withhold it can be a grave injustice.221 In determining fair pay both the needs and the contributions of each person must be taken into account. "Remuneration for work should guarantee man the opportunity to provide a dignified livelihood for himself and his family on the material, social, cultural and spiritual level, taking into account the role and the productivity of each, the state of the business, and the common good." Agreement between the parties is not sufficient to justify morally the amount to be received in wages.
  8. ^ Gaume, Jean (1883). The Catechism of Perseverance; Or, An Historical, Dogmatical, Moral, Liturgical, Apologetical, Philosophical, and Social Exposition of Religion. M.H. Gill & Son. p. 871. Q. What are the capital sins? A. The capital sins are mortal sins of their own nature, and the sources of many other sins. They are seven in number: pride, covetousness, lust, gluttony, envy, anger, and sloth. ... Q. What other sins ought we to fear most? A. The other sins that we ought to fear most are sins against the Holy Ghost and sins that cry to Heaven for vengeance.
  9. ^ Tuberville, Henry. The Douay Catechism of 1649 (PDF). p. 105.
  10. ^ Catechism of the Catholic Church 1867 The catechetical tradition also recalls that there are "sins that cry to heaven": the blood of Abel, the sin of the Sodomites, the cry of the people oppressed in Egypt, the cry of the foreigner, the widow, and the orphan, injustice to the wage earner.

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