List of former primary state highways in Virginia (Bristol District)

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The following is a list of former primary state highways completely or mostly within the Bristol District (VDOT District 1[1]) of the U.S. state of Virginia.

SR 62[edit]

Virginia 62.svgVirginia 101 (old).svg

State Route 62 (1933-1942)
State Route 101 (1928-1933)
Location: Ewing-Tennessee
Existed: 1928–1942

State Route 62 extended south along current secondary SR 744 from US 58 (now US 58 Business) east of Ewing to the Tennessee state line, continuing as an unnumbered county road in the direction of Alanthus Hill and Tennessee State Route 63. It was added to the state highway system in 1928 as State Route 101,[2] changed to SR 62 in the 1933 renumbering,[3] and downgraded to secondary in 1942.[4]

SR 63[edit]

Virginia 63.svgVirginia 102 (old).svg

State Route 63 (1933-1946)
State Route 102 (1928-1933)
Location: US 58-Tennessee
Existed: 1928–1946

State Route 63 extended south along current secondary SR 758 from US 58 between Beech Spring and Jonesville across the Powell River on Flanary Bridge to the Tennessee state line, continuing as an unnumbered county road in the direction of Tennessee State Route 63 at Mulberry Gap. 6.2 miles (10.0 km) of road, a majority of the route, was added to the state highway system in 1928 as State Route 102,[5] which was extended another 1.2 miles (1.9 km) in 1930.[6] In the 1933 renumbering, SR 102 became SR 63,[3] which was extended the final 12 mile (0.80 km) to the state line in October 1933[7] and downgraded to secondary in 1946.[8]

SR 65[edit]

Virginia 65.svgVirginia 64.svgVirginia 11 (old).svg

State Route 65 (1940-1943)
part of State Route 64 (1933-1940)
part of State Route 11 (1918-1933)
Location: Woodway-northeast
Existed: 1918–1943

State Route 65 extended northeast along part of current secondary SR 642 from SR 66 (now SR 785, bypassed by modern US 421) at Woodway to SR 64 (now US 58 Alternate) between Dryden and Deep Springs. (SR 642 continues southwest from Woodway to a dead end near the Powell River, and used to extend across the river and along present SR 640, SR 783, and SR 614 to SR 654 southwest of Jonesville.[9]) It was added to the state highway system as part of State Route 11 in the original network defined by the state legislature in 1918,[10] and kept that number until the 1933 renumbering, when it became part of State Route 64.[3] The last piece of the shortcut east from Pennington Gap that US 58 Alt. now follows was added in 1937 as part of SR 66,[11] and in the 1940 renumbering, SR 70 (replacement for most of SR 64) used this cutoff, with the former route northeast of Woodway becoming a new SR 65.[12] SR 65 was downgraded to secondary in 1943[13] as an extension of existing SR 642.[9]

SR 69[edit]

Virginia 69.svgVirginia 133 (old).svg

State Route 69 (1933-1951)
State Route 133 (1930-1933)
Location: Kent Junction-Dunbar
Existed: 1930–1951

State Route 69 paralleled a branch of the Interstate Railroad along most of present SR 603, from US 23 (now US 23 Business) at Kent Junction north to Dunbar (SR 603 continued another 2.1 miles (3.4 km) to Pardee, which was mentioned as an eventual endpoint in descriptions of SR 69).[14] 2.8 miles (4.5 km) of the route was added to the state highway system in 1930 as State Route 133,[15] which was extended another 3 miles (4.8 km) to Dunbar in 1932.[16] SR 133 became SR 69 in the 1933 renumbering[3] and was downgraded to secondary in 1951[17] as an extension of existing SR 603.[14]

SR 73[edit]

Virginia 73.svg

State Route 73 (1933-ca. 1949)
Location: Norton-south
Existed: 1932–ca. 1949

State Route 73 followed present secondary SR 619 from US 23 (now US 23 Business) at the intersection of Main Avenue and 12th Street in Norton[18] south past High Knob to the Wise-Scott County line in the direction of Fort Blackmore. Most of the route was added to the state highway system in 1932, with no number given,[19] and assigned SR 73 in the 1933 renumbering.[3] SR 73 was extended the remaining 0.4 miles (0.64 km) to the county line (replacing SR 619,[14] which continued to exist in Scott County[20]) in 1937,[21] but in 1948 it was downgraded to secondary effective completion of ongoing construction work,[22] for which the contract was awarded in November 1948.[23]

SR 74[edit]

Virginia 74.svgVirginia 134 (old).svg

State Route 74 (1933-1942)
State Route 134 (1930-1933)
Location: Bolton-southwest
Existed: 1930–1942

State Route 74 extended southwest from SR 64 (now US 58 Alternate) at Bolton along current SR 613 down the valley of Big Moccasin Creek past Willow Spring to about 14 mile (0.40 km) beyond the intersection with SR 606.[24] (SR 613 continues southwest to SR 71 near Snowflake.) 4.1 miles (6.6 km) out of Bolton were added to the state highway system in 1930 as State Route 134,[25] which was extended another 2.2 miles (3.5 km) in 1932.[26] SR 134 became SR 74 in the 1933 renumbering[3] and was downgraded to secondary in 1942[27] as an extension of existing SR 613.[24]

SR 76[edit]

Virginia 76.svgVirginia 109 (old).svg

State Route 76 (1933-1970)
State Route 109 (1928-1933)
Location: Bristol-northeast
Existed: 1928–1970

State Route 76 extended northeast from downtown Bristol to US 11 south of Wallace via Kingtown. The former route, which mostly followed King Mill Pike, Old Airport Road, and Bonham Road, is now located entirely within Bristol city limits.

3.24 miles (5.21 km) of road from Bristol towards Kings Mill (now Cleveland, southwest of Green Spring) were added to the state highway system in 1928 as State Route 109,[28] but in reality the route left King Mill Pike about 2 miles (3.2 km) out of Bristol, turning northeast on Old Airport Road. The remainder to US 11 was added in 1930,[29] and in 1932 the routing in Bristol was defined, beginning at the city limits on Massachusetts Avenue near Concord Street (halfway between Montpelier Avenue and Madison Street) and following Fairview Street, Danville Avenue, and Goodson Street. Primary extension funding was assigned to two routes down to State Street (US 421), one directly down Goodson Street and the other turning west on Mary Street and southwest approximately along modern MLK Boulevard.[30] SR 109 became SR 76 in the 1933 renumbering.[3] An extra 34 mile (1.2 km) was added in 1934,[31] but the 1932 official Washington County map shows that the route was already complete.[32]

SR 76 followed Goodson Street all the way to State Street by 1936,[33] and State Route 76Y was on Mary Street by 1941, with its west end at Oakview Avenue (then US 11, now SR 113).[34] In 1947, SR 76 swapped with SR 658 at its north end, moving from Old Airport Road to Bonham Road,[35] and the routing in downtown Bristol was modified slightly in 1952.[36] In 1966, SR 76 and SR 76Y were removed from Bristol altogether, with a portion on Goodson and Mary Streets becoming a realigned US 421.[37] The remaining 3 miles (4.8 km) of SR 76 lying outside Bristol were downgraded to secondary SR 895 in 1970;[38] SR 895 itself was later swallowed up by the expanding city limits of Bristol.

SR 77[edit]

Virginia 77.svgVirginia 75.svg

State Route 77 (1940-1942)
State Route 75 (1933-1940)
Location: US 58-northeast
Existed: 1932–1942

State Route 77 extended northeast along part of current secondary SR 700 from US 58 northwest of Three Springs, via Benhams, to a point about 14 mile (0.40 km) beyond SR 640.[39] The route was added to the state highway system in 1932, with no number given,[40] and became SR 75 in the 1933 renumbering.[3] (The descriptions from 1932 and 1933 indicate that it was intended to reach SR 42, now SR 802, in the future, but don't give any details on how it would have crossed the ridges in between.) The numbers 75 and 77 were swapped in the 1940 renumbering to free up SR 75 to match Tennessee[41] (which never happened), but only two years later the newly-designated State Route 77 was downgraded to secondary[42] as an extension of existing SR 700.[39]

SR 78[edit]

Virginia 78.svgVirginia 87.svgVirginia 136 (old).svg

State Route 78 (1940-1944)
State Route 87 (1933-1940)
State Route 136 (1930-1933)
Location: Gratton-Burkes Garden
Existed: 1930–1944

State Route 78 extended southeast from SR 61 at Gratton along present secondary SR 623 (the old Tazewell Courthouse and Fancy Gap Turnpike[citation needed]) over Rich Mountain and into Burkes Garden, ending about 14 mile (0.40 km) short of SR 625.[43] 7 miles (11 km) of the road was added to the state highway system in 1930 as State Route 136,[44] which was extended another 1 mile (1.6 km) in 1932.[45] In the 1933 renumbering, SR 136 became State Route 87 (where the description included a planned extension to SR 42 at Sharon Springs),[3] which became SR 78 in the 1940 renumbering (since SR 87 was needed to match North Carolina)[46] and was downgraded to secondary in 1944[47] as an extension of existing SR 623.[43]

SR 79[edit]

Virginia 79.svgVirginia 135 (old).svg

State Route 79 (1933-1953)
State Route 135 (1930-1933)
Location: Lodi-Chilhowie
Existed: 1930–1953

State Route 79 followed present secondary SR 762 from SR 91 north of Lodi east to St. Clair Bottom (where SR 79 included a now-bypassed piece of SR 600) and north to US 11 in Chilhowie. The first 1.9 miles (3.1 km) out of Chilhowie were added to the state highway system in 1930 as State Route 135,[48] which was extended another 2.1 miles (3.4 km) to St. Clair Bottom in 1931[49] and became SR 79 in the 1933 renumbering.[3]

In 1945, the portion of SR 81 from St. Clair Bottom east to Dickey Gap became secondary SR 650,[50] and SR 79 was extended west from St. Clair Bottom to Lodi to replace the now-disconnected western segment of SR 81. (This road had been defined at the route of SR 12 in 1924,[51] and became US 58 in 1933 and SR 81 in 1940.) All of SR 79 was downgraded to secondary in 1953,[52] but a short piece in Chilhowie, north of the new Interstate 81, became part of SR 107 in 1968.[53]

Major intersections
County Location mi[52] km Destinations Notes
Washington 0.00 0.00 SR 91 (Monroe Road)
Smyth SR 600 (Whitetop Road) to Whitetop Mountain
St. Clair Bottom SR 660 (Riverside Road) former SR 81 east
Chilhowie 12.35 19.88 US 11 (Lee Highway) – Abingdon, Marion
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

SR 89[edit]

Virginia 89.svgVirginia 114 (old).svg

State Route 89 (1933-1938)
State Route 114 (1928-1933)
Location: Wytheville
Existed: 1928–1938

State Route 89 extended southwest along current secondary SR 667 from US 21 (now 18th Street[54]) in Wytheville to SR 654 at the Wytheville National Fish Hatchery.[55] It was added to the state highway system in 1928 as State Route 114,[56] renumbered SR 89 in the 1933 renumbering,[3] and downgraded to secondary in 1938[57] as an extension of existing SR 667.[55]

SR 95[edit]

Virginia 95.svgVirginia 118 (old).svg

State Route 95 (1933-1953)
State Route 118 (1928-1933)
Location: Dry Run Gap-Providence
Existed: 1928–1953

State Route 63 extended east along current secondary SR 805 from US 21 south of Dry Run Gap to SR 94 (now SR 649) at Providence, passing near Spring Valley. The easternmost 4.5 miles (7.2 km) were added to the state highway system in 1928 as State Route 118,[58] which was extended another 5.1 miles (8.2 km) in 1930[59] and the remaining 1.9 miles (3.1 km) in 1932.[60] SR 118 became SR 95 in the 1933 renumbering[3] and was downgraded to secondary in 1953.[61]

SR 289[edit]

State Route 289
Location: south of Wytheville
Existed: 1934–1942

State Route 289 was a 680 feet (210 m) long route spurring east from US 21 south of Wytheville on what is now the beginning of secondary State Route 696 (Barrett Mill Road). It was added to the primary system in 1934, on new alignment that connected a realigned US 21 to what was then part of SR 644,[54][62] and downgraded to secondary in 1942.[63]

References[edit]

  1. ^ VDOT District Offices
  2. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (August 9–10, 1928). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 13. [Lee County] 101 Route 10 near Rose Hill Southeast 3.7 Miles to the Tennessee Line 3.70 Miles 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Virginia Department of Highways, Numbers and Descriptions of Routes in State Highway Primary System, July 1, 1933
  4. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (September 15, 1942). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 15. Route 62 -From intersection of Route 58 near Ewing, south to the Tennessee State Line 3.70 miles 
  5. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (August 9–10, 1928). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 13. [Lee County] 102 Route 10 near Cony Hollow to a point 6.16 Miles Southwest towards the Tennessee Line 6.16 Miles 
  6. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (December 18, 1930). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Lynchburg, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 4. [Lee County] 102 Extension of Route 102 to Tennessee Line [1.20 miles, first half of Porter-Rhodes mileage] 
  7. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (October 19, 1933). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 21. Lee Extension of Route 63 to Tennessee Line .49 
  8. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (May 2–3, 1946). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Roanoke, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 5. Lee County, Route 63 7.30 From Route 58 to Tennessee State Line. It forms no Primary connection at the Tennessee State Line. A purely local road that has no future possibilities for further development. This route carried 220 vehicles in 1941 and 194 in 1945. 
  9. ^ a b Virginia Department of Highways, Map of Lee County Showing Primary and Secondary Highways, revised July 1, 1935, reprinted in the 1940 Census
  10. ^ An Act to establish "The State Highway System", Act No. 10 of 1918
  11. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (November 9, 1937). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 25. Lee 66 Extension to Route 64 1.28 
  12. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (October 10, 1940). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 36. 65 From Int. of Route 70 to Woodway. Short section of old Route 64 no longer a main route. 
  13. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (May 12, 1943). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 17. Lee County Route 65 6.93 From intersection of Route 70 east of Dryden to intersection Route 66 at Woodway. The construction of parallel Route 70 diverted practically all except purely local traffic from this road. Traffic 1941 - 484, 1942 - 228, present - 125. 
  14. ^ a b c Virginia Department of Highways, Map of Wise County Showing Primary and Secondary Highways, revised July 1, 1935, reprinted in the 1940 Census
  15. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (December 18, 1930). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Lynchburg, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 5. [Wise County] 133 Route 11 in direction of Pardee [2.82 miles, first half of Porter-Rhodes mileage] 
  16. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (July 27–29, 1932). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Marion, Roanoke, and Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 14. [Wise County, second half of Porter-Rhodes mileage] Route 133, from Route 11, in direction of Pardee 3.00 
  17. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (April 9–11, 1951). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Roanoke and Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 20. Wise County Route 69 5.59 Route 69 from Route 23 at Kent Junction to Route 603 at Dunbar. 
  18. ^ Virginia Department of Highways, Map of Wise County Showing Primary and Secondary Highways, revised July 1, 1936
  19. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (July 27–29, 1932). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Marion, Roanoke, and Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 14. [Wise County, second half of Porter-Rhodes mileage] Route 11-South towards High Knob 4.82 
  20. ^ Virginia Department of Highways, Map of Scott County Showing Primary and Secondary Highways, revised July 1, 1935, reprinted in the 1940 Census
  21. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (November 9, 1937). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 25. Wise 73 Norton to Scott County Line 0.38 
  22. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (May 24–26, 1948). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 22, 26. Wise County Route 73 5.40 Route 73 from Route 23 in Norton to the Scott County Line. The following deletions to be accomplished after expenditure of existing appropriations for improvement - Route 73 - Norton to Scott County Line 
  23. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (November 12, 1948). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Lexington, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 2. 
  24. ^ a b Virginia Department of Highways, Map of Russell County Showing Primary and Secondary Highways, revised July 1, 1935, reprinted in the 1940 Census
  25. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (December 18, 1930). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Lynchburg, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 4. [Russell County] 134 Route 10[sic] near Bolton-Southwest down Moccasin Valley [4.12 miles, first half of Porter-Rhodes mileage] 
  26. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (July 27–29, 1932). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Marion, Roanoke, and Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 14. [Russell County, second half of Porter-Rhodes mileage] Route 110, near Bolton-Southwest down Moccasin Valley 2.24 
  27. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (September 15, 1942). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 15. Russell Route 74 -From Route 64 at Bolton, southwest to Route 613 6.36 miles 
  28. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (August 9–10, 1928). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 14. [Washington County] 109 Bristol to a point 3.24 Miles towards Kings Mill 3.24 Miles 
  29. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (December 18, 1930). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Lynchburg, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 5. [Washington County] 109 Airport to Route 11 [1.00 miles, first half of Porter-Rhodes mileage] 
  30. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (July 19, 1932). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 8. State Street, Front Street, Mary Street to Goodson; State Street, Goodson Street, Danville Avenue, Fairview Street, Massachusetts Avenue 
  31. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (September 19, 1934). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. Washington 76 End of Maintenance to Route 11 0.76 
  32. ^ Virginia Department of Highways, Map of Washington County Showing Primary and Secondary Highways, June 1, 1932
  33. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (August 12, 1936). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 17. 
  34. ^ partial scan of 1941-42 official state map
  35. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (June 25, 1947). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 21. 76 (2) Washington County Rt. 658 0.80 Route 658 from Route 11 to Route 76 at the old airport. 658 (1) Washington County Rt. 76 0.96 Route 76 from Route 11 to Route 658. 
  36. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (May 4–7, 1952). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Roanoke and Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 18. Route 76 Northbound - From the intersection of Lee and Cumberland Streets, east along Cumberland to Front, south along Front [now MLK] to State, east along State to Goodson, thence north along Goodson. Route 76 Southbound - South along Goodson to State, east[sic] along State to 4th. 
  37. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (December 15, 1966). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. pp. 17–19. 
  38. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (April 23, 1970). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Natural Bridge, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 17. Moved by Mr. Hairston, seconded by Mr. Fitzpatrick, that WHEREAS, under Section 33-27 of the 1950 Code of Virginia, as amended, the State Highway Commission may transfer from the Primary System to the Secondary System such roads, bridges, and streets as it shall deem proper, not to exceed 150 miles during any one year; and WHEREAS, Route 76 in the City of Bristol having heretofore been eliminated as a primary route extension, the Board of Supervisors of Washington County has by resolution requested the transfer of Route 76 in Washington County from the Primary System to the Secondary System, between the ECL Bristol and Route 11; and WHEREAS, traffic studies indicate that the portion of present Route 76 remaining in Washington County no longer meets the essential requirements of a primary facility; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that, under the authority of Section 33-27 of the 1950 Code of Virginia, as amended, the remaining portion of Route 76 in Washington County, beginning at the ECL of Bristol and extending in a northerly direction to the intersection of Route 11, approximately 3.00 miles, be transferred from the Primary System to the Secondary System of Highways and designated as new Route 895. MOTION CARRIED. 
  39. ^ a b Virginia Department of Highways, Map of Washington County Showing Primary and Secondary Highways, revised July 1, 1935, reprinted in the 1940 Census
  40. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (July 27–29, 1932). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Marion, Roanoke, and Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 14. [Washington County, second half of Porter-Rhodes mileage] Route 10 near the Valley Institute-Northeast in the direction of Route 42 5.15 
  41. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (October 10, 1940). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 37. 77 From Int. of Route 58 near Valley Institute Northeast. Old Route 75 changed to 77. Changed to provide number. 
  42. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (September 15, 1942). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 15. Washington Route 77 -From intersection of Route 58 west of Bristol, northeast to Benham 5.15 miles 
  43. ^ a b Virginia Department of Highways, Map of Tazewell County Showing Primary and Secondary Highways, revised July 1, 1935, reprinted in the 1940 Census
  44. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (December 18, 1930). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Lynchburg, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 4. [Tazewell County] 136 Route 127 near Gratton to Burkes Garden [7.00 miles, first half of Porter-Rhodes mileage] 
  45. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (July 27–29, 1932). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Marion, Roanoke, and Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 14. [Tazewell County, second half of Porter-Rhodes mileage] Extension of Route 136 towards Burke Garden 1.00 
  46. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (October 10, 1940). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 37. 78 From Int. of Route 61 near Gratton to Burkes Garden, thence south toward Rt. 42. Changed to provide number to conform with Tenn[sic]. 
  47. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (April 18, 1944). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 6. Tazewell County Route 78 8.00 From intersection Route 61 at Gratton southeasterly 8.00 miles to end of maintenance at Route 623 south of Burkes Garden. This is a stub end lightly traveled route. Traffic 1941 - 142, a peak year. 
  48. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (December 18, 1930). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Lynchburg, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 4. [Smyth County] 135 Chilhowie-South toward Route 12 [1.90 miles, first half of Porter-Rhodes mileage] 
  49. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (July 24–25, 1931). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Virginia Beach, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 70. Smyth 135 Extension of Route 135 to Route 12 2.10 
  50. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (May 22, 1945). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 69. 650 (2) Smyth County, Route 81 16.55 From Route 79 easterly to Route 16. 
  51. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (May 14, 1924). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 325. Moved by Mr. Sproul, seconded by Mr. Massie, that the location of Route 12 from Independence to the intersection of Route 10, be via Mouth of Wilson, Troutdale, Comers Creek Valley, to Rye Valley, thence along the Valley of the South Fork of Holston River to a point near Friendship, thence to near Damascus, thence in a north-westerly direction to intersect State Highway No. 10 east of Abingdon. Motion carried. 
  52. ^ a b State Highway Commission of Virginia (May 11–15, 1953). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Roanoke and Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 19. Smyth County Route 79 6.25 Washington County Route 79 6.10 Route 79 from the intersection of Route 11 in Chilhowie to the intersection of Route 91 north of Lodi 
  53. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (November 21, 1968). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Charlottesville, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 19. Moved by Judge Weaver seconded by Mr. Fitzpatrick that, WHEREAS, necessary studies of Secondary Route T-762 between Route 11 and Interstate Route 81 in the Town of Chilhowie (Smyth County) have been conducted to determine if this section of road could be included in the State Primary System; and WHEREAS, the results of these studies indicate that this portion of Route T-762 should logically be included in the Primary System, serving as a direct connection from Route 11 to Route 81 at Chilhowie with traffic volumes averaging some 3,280 VPD; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that pursuant to Section 33-26 of the 1950 Code of Virginia, as amended, that the aforementioned section of Route T-762, length 0.30 mile, be transferred from the Secondary System to the Primary System of highways, and further be designated as a continuation of Primary Route 107. MOTION CARRIED. 
  54. ^ a b United States Geological Survey, Speedwell, VA, 1930 and 1939
  55. ^ a b Virginia Department of Highways, Map of Wythe County Showing Primary and Secondary Highways, revised July 1, 1935, reprinted in the 1940 Census
  56. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (August 9–10, 1928). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 15. [Wythe County] 114 Route 10 - 3.6 Miles to the Fish Hatchery 3.60 Miles 
  57. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (May 3, 1938). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 18. Moved by Mr. Rawls, seconded by Mr. Wysor, that in accordance with Chapter 212, Section 1, Act of 1926, and upon request of the Board of Supervisors of Wythe County by resolution of April 6th, 1938, in which the Chairman of the State Highway Commission concurs, the section of State highway leading to the Fish Hatchery, being State Highway Route 89, Wythe County, is no longer necessary for use as a State highway and the same be abandoned as a primary route and revert to the secondary system of roads in Wythe County, Motion carried. 
  58. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (August 9–10, 1928). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 12. [Grayson County] 118 Route 121 near Providence Church to a point 4.53 Miles up Spring Valley towards Route 26 4.53 Miles 
  59. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (December 18, 1930). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Lynchburg, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 3. [Grayson County] 118 Extension of Route 118-West [5.10 miles, first half of Porter-Rhodes mileage] 
  60. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (July 27–29, 1932). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Marion, Roanoke, and Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 13. [Grayson County, second half of Porter-Rhodes mileage] Extension of Route 118 west to Route 26 1.90 
  61. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (May 11–15, 1953). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Roanoke and Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 19. Grayson County Route 95 11.22 Route 95 from the intersection of Route 94 southwest of Fries to the intersection of Route 21 at Turkey Fork. 
  62. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (September 19, 1934). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. Wythe Beginning at or near Station 11518 on Route 21, Project 598D, and extending southeasterly approximately 676 ft. to C-644, known as the Barrett Road 0.128 
  63. ^ State Highway Commission of Virginia (September 15, 1942). Minutes of Meeting (PDF) (Report). Richmond, VA: Commonwealth of Virginia. p. 15. Wythe Route 289 -From Route 21 East 0.13 mile