Susan Sullivan (politician)

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Susan Sullivan
B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., MHA
Minister of Health & Community Services of Newfoundland and Labrador
In office
October 28, 2011 – May 1, 2014
Preceded by Jerome Kennedy
Succeeded by Paul Davis
Member of the Newfoundland and Labrador House of Assembly
for Grand Falls-Windsor-Buchans
In office
November 27, 2007 – November 5, 2015
Preceded by Anna Thistle
Succeeded by District Abolished
Minister of Innovation, Trade and Rural Development of Newfoundland and Labrador
In office
December 6, 2010 – October 28, 2011
Preceded by Shawn Skinner
Succeeded by Department eliminated
Minister of Human Resources, Labour & Employment of Newfoundland and Labrador
In office
October 31, 2008 – December 6, 2010
Preceded by Shawn Skinner
Succeeded by Joan Burke (acting)
Deputy Mayor of Grand Falls-Windsor, Newfoundland and Labrador
In office
2005–2007
Personal details
Born Grand Falls-Windsor, Newfoundland and Labrador
Political party Progressive Conservative
Occupation Educator

Susan Sullivan is a Canadian politician in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. She represented the electoral district of Grand Falls-Windsor-Buchans in Newfoundland and Labrador House of Assembly from 2007 to 2015. She was a member of the Progressive Conservative Party.

She served in the provincial cabinet as Minister of Education and Early Childhood Development, Minister of Innovation, Business and Rural Development, Minister of Health and Community Services, Minister of Innovation, Trade and Rural Development and Minister of Human Resources, Labour and Employment. Prior to her entrance into provincial politics Sullivan had a 30-year teaching career and was the Deputy Mayor of Grand Falls-Windsor.[1]

Background[edit]

Sullivan was born and raised in Grand Falls-Windsor, Newfoundland and Labrador. She studied at Memorial University of Newfoundland, where she obtained a Bachelor of Arts, majoring in French, and a Bachelor of Education. She received her Masters of Education from Mount St. Vincent University, in Halifax, as well she was awarded a French immersion diploma from Université Laval, in Quebec City.[2] Sullivan had a 30-year teaching career and retired in June 2007. In her last seven years as an educator she was French Department Head for the Centre for Distance Learning and Innovation, during this time she taught senior high French to all parts of the province via the Internet. In 2005, she was elected Deputy Mayor of Grand Falls-Windsor and held this post until entering provincial politics.[2]

Provincial politics[edit]

In June 2007, Sullivan defeated two others to win the Progressive Conservative Party nomination for the district of Grand Falls-Windsor-Buchans. In the three-person race, Sullivan captured 53 per cent of the 1,700 votes cast.[3] The provincial election was set for October 9, 2007, but during the campaign Sullivan's Liberal opponent died suddenly.[4] The election in the district was postponed due to the death and was held on November 6, 2007. After a big victory by the Progressive Conservatives in the general election, Sullivan took 72 per cent of the vote in the deferred election.[5] On October 31, 2008, Premier Danny Williams appointed Sullivan to cabinet as the Minister of Human Resources, Labour and Employment and Minister responsible for Francophone Affairs.[6] On December 6, 2010, Premier Kathy Dunderdale appointed Sullivan as Minister of Innovation, Trade, and Rural Development, Minister responsible for the Status of Women and she continued as Minister responsible for Francophone Affairs.[7]

In the October 11, 2011 provincial election, Sullivan was easily re-elected as the member of the House of Assembly (MHA) for Grand Falls-Windsor-Buchans. Weeks later she was sworn in as the Minister of Health and Community Services.[8] On May 1, 2014, Sullivan was moved to the Department of Innovation, Business and Rural Development.[9] On September 5, 2014, she was given an additional role in cabinet as Minister responsible for the Status of Women.[10] When Paul Davis took over as premier in September 2014, Sullivan was appointed Minister of Education and Early Childhood Development.[11] On October 16, 2015, Sullivan announced that she would not seek re-election in the 2015 election.[12][13]

Electoral record[edit]

Newfoundland and Labrador general election, 2011
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Progressive Conservative Susan Sullivan 2,957 61.62%
Liberal Wayne Morris 1,540 32.09%
     NDP John Whelan 302 6.29%
2007 general election, November 6, 2007
Party Candidate Votes % ±
  Progressive Conservative Susan Sullivan 2,767 71.83
     NDP Junior C. Downey 922 23.93
Liberal John J. Woodrow 163 4.23

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Premier Dunderdale Appoints New Cabinet, Announces Departmental Restructuring". Government of Newfoundland and Labrador. 28 October 2011. Retrieved 31 October 2011. 
  2. ^ a b "House of Assembly - Susan Sullivan". Government of Newfoundland and Labrador. Retrieved 31 October 2011. 
  3. ^ "Sullivan gets PC nod in Grand Falls-area district". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. 12 June 2007. Retrieved 30 March 2016. 
  4. ^ Pelley, Jennifer (4 October 2007). "Liberal candidate dies suddenly". The Advertiser. Retrieved 28 December 2013. 
  5. ^ "Tories take resounding win in deferred N.L. vote". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. 6 November 2007. Retrieved 28 December 2013. 
  6. ^ "Marshall, Kennedy swap seats as Williams shuffles cabinet deck". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. 31 October 2008. Retrieved 28 December 2013. 
  7. ^ "Dunderdale announces changes to cabinet". The Telegram. 6 December 2010. Retrieved 28 December 2013. 
  8. ^ "Dunderdale unveils leaner cabinet". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. 28 October 2011. Retrieved 30 March 2016. 
  9. ^ "Tom Marshall shuffles ministers in high-profile portfolios". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. 1 May 2014. Retrieved 30 March 2016. 
  10. ^ "Ross Wiseman named finance minister by outgoing premier". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. 5 September 2014. Retrieved 30 March 2016. 
  11. ^ "Paul Davis taps Steve Kent as deputy premier". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. 30 September 2014. Retrieved 30 March 2016. 
  12. ^ "Susan Sullivan won't seek re-election". The Telegram. 16 October 2015. Retrieved 30 March 2016. 
  13. ^ "Susan Sullivan will not seek re-election". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. 16 October 2015. Retrieved 30 March 2016. 

External links[edit]