Talaq (film)

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Talaq
Talaq-1958.jpg
Directed by Mahesh Kaul
Produced by Mahesh Kaul, Mukhram Sharma
Written by Mukhram Sharma
Starring Rajendra Kumar
Music by C. Ramchandra
Cinematography Vasant Nagesh Buva
Edited by R.V. Shrikhande
Distributed by Anupam Chitra
Release date
  • 1958 (1958)
Country India
Language Hindi

Talaq or Talaaq is a 1958 Indian Bollywood film starring Rajendra Kumar and produced by Anupam Chitra studios.[1] Director Mahesh Kaul was nominated for a Filmfare Award for Best Director and it was also nominated for a Filmfare Award for Best Movie. The music is by C. Ramchandra. Playback singers for the film include Asha Bhosle and Mohammed Rafi with songs such as 'Mere jeevan me' and 'Zuk Gayi Dekho Garda' .[2] Art direction for the film was conducted by Biren Nag and it was shot in Ranjit Studios in Bombay.

Plot[edit]

The film begins with school teacher Indu (Kamini Kadam) in her school. She lives with her eccentric check-suited unemployed father, Moolchand Chabbe (Radhakrishan). She falls in love with Ravi Shankar Chaube (Rajendra Kumar), a poet and an engineer after hearing him singing patriotic songs during an Independence day celebration. He moves in to live in the room beneath their apartment. They marry, and Indu quits her job to raise a son named Ashoo. The marriage becomes difficult when Moolchand borrows money from Ravi and loses it gambling. Indu is forced to return to her old job and faces the prospect of a divorce.

Cast[edit]

Music[edit]

  1. "Mere Jivan Me Kiran Banake Bikharanewaale" - Asha Bhosle, Manna Dey
  2. "Bigul Baj Rahaa Aazaadi Kaa, Kahani Hai Ek Baat" - Manna Dey
  3. "Lagi Jo Takkar, Are Kha Gaye Chakkar, Jhuk Gai Dekho Gardan" - Asha Bhosle
  4. "Nayee Umar Kee Kaliyo Tumako" - Asha Bhosle
  5. "Zara Toh Aankhen Dekho Mila Ke (O Babu Saab" - Manna Dey, Asha Bhosle
  6. "Ai Duniyaa Ke Maan Baap, Dukhiyon PeKuchh Raham Karo" - Aarti Mukherjee, Asha Bhosle

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gavankar, Nilu N (20 July 2011). The Desai Trio and the Movie Industry of India. AuthorHouse. p. 179. ISBN 978-1-4634-1941-7. Retrieved 4 October 2011. 
  2. ^ Ranade, Ashok Da. (1 January 2006). Hindi film song: music beyond boundaries. Bibliophile South Asia. p. 216. ISBN 978-81-85002-64-4. Retrieved 4 October 2011. 

External links[edit]