Lifewatch, Taskforce of United Methodists on Abortion and Sexuality

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Lifewatch, Taskforce of United Methodists on Abortion and Sexuality
United Methodist March for Life - Lifewatch TUMAS.jpg
Clergy and laity at the 2017 United Methodist event for the March for Life hosted by Lifewatch, Taskforce of United Methodists on Abortion and Sexuality
Founded 1987
Type Methodist Christian
Focus Pro-life movement
Location
  • Cottleville, MO 63338
Area served
Worldwide
Members
4000+
Key people
Rev. Paul T. Stallsworth, President
Volunteers
Sixteen
Website www.lifewatch.org

The Lifewatch, Taskforce of United Methodists on Abortion and Sexuality (TUMAS) is a pro-life organization within the United Methodist Church, founded in 1987.[1] The organization publishes a quarterly newsletter titled Lifewatch and is a part of the National Pro-Life Religious Council.[2] The organization also frequently holds seminars to address issues regarding the pro-life movement within Methodist Christianity.[3] It is committed to reversing the Roe v. Wade decision "by first providing theological leadership within the church, which will set an example that political, legal and cultural forces will follow."[4]

There was an attempt to withdraw the United Methodist Church membership in the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice at their General Conference, held in May 2012, with a petition that passed through the legislative subcommittee and committee votes, but was not given a floor vote. Rev. Paul T. Stallsworth, president of the Taskforce of United Methodists on Abortion and Sexuality said he "had every reason to believe" that pro-life delegates would have won a floor vote.[5]

The General Conference of the United Methodist Church voted on 19 May 2016 that his two entities who were members of the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice should withdraw immediately, after a motion had been approved with a 425-268 votes difference. At the same General Conference, delegates voted to delete a four-decade-old statement from the Book of Resolutions which affirmed the Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision on the legality of abortion. A new resolution was overwhelmingly re-adopted 56-2 (97,3 percent), decrying gender-selective abortion, describing abortion as "violent" and opposing it for "trivial reasons".[6] This was seen as a major win for the pro-life wing of the United Methodist Church.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The rebirth of orthodoxy: signs of new life in Christianity. HarperCollins. Retrieved 2009-01-04. 
  2. ^ Rev. Paul T. Stallsworth. "Lifewatch Statement". National Pro-Life Religious Council. Retrieved 2009-01-04. 
  3. ^ Connor Ewing. United Methodist Bishop Scott Jones Addresses Pro-Life Event. Institute on Religion and Democracy. Retrieved 2009-01-04. The United Methodist Building in Washington, DC was used on the morning of January 22 to defend the dignity and sanctity of unborn life. The occasion was the twenty-second annual Lifewatch Sanctity of Life Service of Worship, sponsored by The Taskforce of United Methodists on Abortion and Sexuality. 
  4. ^ Melissa Lauber. Lifewatch Worship Service Protests Roe v. Wade. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved 2009-01-04. Lifewatch hopes to reverse Roe v. Wade by first providing theological leadership within the Church, which will set an example that political, legal and cultural forces will follow. 
  5. ^ Methodist pro-life leader blasts UMC Conference's continued ties to pro-abortion religious group, LifeSiteNews, 14 May 2012
  6. ^ United Methodists Repeal Previous Endorsement of Roe v. Wade, Juicy Ecumenism, May 21, 2016, Article by John Lomperis
  7. ^ General Conference votes to withdraw from Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice, The United Methodist Reporter, 19 May 2016

External links[edit]