Texture (visual arts): Difference between revisions

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Light is an important factor for physical texture as well, because it can affect how a surface is viewed. Strong lights on a smooth surface can obscure the readability of a drawing or photograph, while they can create strong contrasts in a highly texture surface like cloth or a sculpture
 
Light is an important factor for physical texture as well, because it can affect how a surface is viewed. Strong lights on a smooth surface can obscure the readability of a drawing or photograph, while they can create strong contrasts in a highly texture surface like cloth or a sculpture
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=== Visual ===
 
=== Visual ===

Revision as of 15:35, 12 October 2009

In the visual arts, texture is the perceived surface quality of an artwork. It is an element of two-dimensional and three-dimensional design and is broadly distinguished by its perceived visual and physical properties. Use of texture, along with other elements of design, can convey a variety of messages and emotions.

2D Texture

Physical

Physical texture, also known as actual texture or tactile texture, are actual tactile variations upon a surface. This can include, but is not limited to, fur, wood grain, sand, smooth surface of canvas or metal, clay, glass and leather. It differentiates itself from visual texture by having a physical quality that can be felt by touch. Specific use of a texture in design can effect the feeling an artwork conveys. For instance, use of rough surfaces can be visually active, while smooth surfaces can be visually restful, while a use of both can be used to give a sense of personality to a design or utilized to create emphasis, rhythm, contrast, etc...[1]

Light is an important factor for physical texture as well, because it can affect how a surface is viewed. Strong lights on a smooth surface can obscure the readability of a drawing or photograph, while they can create strong contrasts in a highly texture surface like cloth or a sculpture bb

Visual

Visual texture is the illusion of having physical texture. Every material and every support surface has its own inherit visual texture and need to be taken into consideration before creating a composition. As such, materials like canvas and watercolor paper are considerably rougher than bristol or computer paper and may not be best suited to creating a flat, smooth texture.

Photography, drawings and paintings use visual texture in order to portray their subject matter realistically or otherwise. Texture in these media are generally created by repetition of shape and line. It is extremely important in realistically portraying subject matter and is essential in the execution of trompe-l'œil, photorealism and hyperrealism for instance.

Implied texture is a visual texture that has no basis in everyday reality.[2] It is most often utilized in works of abstraction.

3D Texture

Characteristic texture

Examples of physical texture

Examples of visual texture

See also

References

  1. ^ Gatto. p. 122-123.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  2. ^ Stewart. p. 381.  Missing or empty |title= (help)

Further reading

  • Gatto, Porter, and Selleck. Exploring Visual Design: The Elements and Principles. 3rd ed. Worcester: Davis Publications, Inc., 2000. ISBN 87192-379-3
  • Stewart, Mary, Launching the imagination: a comprehensive guide to basic design. 2nd ed. New York: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2006. ISBN 0-07-287061-3

External links