The Collaborator (Mirza Waheed novel)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

The Collaborator is the 2011 debut novel by Mirza Waheed. The novel is set on the Indian side of the Line of Control that separates Indian Kashmir from Pakistani Kashmir. The first-person narrator is a young man who ends up working for the Indian Army, counting the number of dead militants, killed in encounters, with the Indian army.[1][2][3][4]

Reception[edit]

The book The Collaborator was featured in 2011 "Books of the Year" in The Telegraph,[5] New Statesman,[6] Business Standard[7] and Telegraph India.[8] It was also 2011 Guardian First Book Award finalist[9] and shortlisted for the 2011 Shakti Bhatt First Book Prize.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/bookreviews/8345157/The-Collaborator-by-Mirza-Waheed-review.html
  2. ^ Claire Chambers, Caroline Herbert Imagining Muslims in South Asia and the Diaspora 1317654129 2014 "This essay argues that Mirza Waheed's 2011 novel, The Collaborator, is characterized by a ..."
  3. ^ Graham Huggan The Oxford Handbook of Postcolonial Studies 2013 Page 194 0191662410 "Activists and writers have challenged the way in which the Indian army has constructed these 'fake encounters' with enemy insurgents. In Mirza Waheed's novel The Collaborator (2011), for instance, the first-person narrator, a young man from ..."
  4. ^ Shubh Mathur The Human Toll of the Kashmir Conflict: Grief and Courage 1137546220 - 2016 "Mirza Waheed's novel The Collaborator, published in 2011, eerily prefigured these discoveries. The protagonist, a young boy living in a border village near the Line of Control, watches as his friends and schoolmates disappear across the line .."
  5. ^ "Books of the Year 2011". The Telegraph. Retrieved 16 March 2015.
  6. ^ "Books of the Year 2011: Hari Kunzru". New Statesman. 17 November 2011. Retrieved 16 March 2015.
  7. ^ "Nilanjana S Roy: The year in books - 2011 and 2012". Business Standard. 3 January 2012. Retrieved 16 March 2015.
  8. ^ "Breaking the Silence". The Telegraph India. 28 November 2011. Retrieved 25 February 2011.
  9. ^ Ramaswamy, Chitra (1 November 2014). "The Book of Gold Leaves review – Mirza Waheed speaks up for Kashmir". The Guardian. Retrieved 16 March 2015.
  10. ^ "Shakti Bhatt First Book Prize shortlist announced". IBN Live. 28 November 2011. Retrieved 16 March 2015.