The Heroic Age (journal)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The Heroic Age: A Journal of Early Medieval Northwestern Europe  
Abbreviated title (ISO 4)
Heroic Age
Discipline History and literature of early medieval Northwestern Europe
Language English
Edited by Larry Swain, Deanna Forsman
Publication details
Publisher
Publication history
1999-present
Frequency Irregular
Indexing
ISSN 1526-1867
LCCN sn99004236
OCLC no. 42017271
Links

The Heroic Age: A Journal of Early Medieval Northwestern Europe is a peer-reviewed academic journal founded in 1998,[1][2] with first issue having been published during spring/summer 1999.[3] The founder and the first editor-in-chief of the journal was Michelle Ziegler.[4][5]

The title of the journal, The Heroic Age, refers to the early medieval period, though there is certain variation in the definition of the period in focus: it is (or has been, in previous versions of their website, calls for papers, and other sources) defined as stretching "from the early 4th through 13th centuries",[6] "from the beginning of the fourth century through the beginning of the thirteenth",[7][8] "from the late fourth through eleventh centuries",[9] "from 400-1100 AD",[10] "approximately [...] between 300 and 1200 CE",[11] and "from the late Roman empire to the advent of the Norman empire".[12] This variation is (partly, at least) accounted for in the Letter from the Editor in Issue 10 (May 2007) as related to changes in the editorial board of the journal: "[...] our Editorial Board experienced a few changes. While some members retired, we also added several new members [...] With these changes in board composition, our attentions necessarily shifted: four of the five new members do significant work on the continent. To address this, our new Mission Statement increases the time period we consider from 400-1100 to 300-1200. Likewise, there is an accompanying shift in geography. Our new Mission Statement addresses all of Northwestern Europe evenly rather than stressing the British Isles."[13]

Publications in The Heroic Age cover all aspects of Early Medieval Northwestern Europe.[7][14] The journal seeks, according to their own homepage, "to foster dialogue between all scholars of this period across ethnic and disciplinary boundaries, including—but not limited to—history, archaeology, and literature pertaining to the period".[15]

The Heroic Age started as a biannual journal: it had a spring/summer and a fall/winter issue in 1999 and in 2000. Two issues were published also in 2010, the first one in August and the second in November. However, the frequency of published issues decreased in the new millennium. No issues of the journal were published in 2002, 2011, 2013, and 2014. Otherwise (that is, in 2001, 2003–2009, 2012, and 2015), one issue per year was published.[16] Larry Swain wrote that the original idea was that The Heroic Age should appear quarterly.[17] Intentions to publish two yearly issues have also been expressed, both in the initial stage,[18] and later.[19]

Regular features include full-length research articles, editions and translations of primary sources, biographical essays, a forum on modern theory and scholarship, a review of relevant web-sites ("Electronic Medievalia"), reviews of scholarship originally published in German, Dutch, and French (a column called "Continental Business"), as well as book reviews (including reviews of scholarly monographs and fiction based on the Middle Ages), and film and television reviews.

In 2010, the journal published a cluster of essays in tandem with postmedieval: a journal of cultural medieval studies.[20][21]

The website of the journal has also a links page.[22]

The editors-in-chief are currently L. J. Swain (Bemidji State University) and Deanna Forsman (North Hennepin Community College).[23][24]

The journal is included databases and bibliographies including the MLA Directory of Periodicals and International Bibliography, EBSCO's Electronic Journal Service, the History of Science Society, and others.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Breen, Thaddeus C. "The main Irish archaeological and historical journals". Irish Archaeology. Retrieved 2015-12-21. The Heroic Age. A fully peer-reviewed academic on-line journal intended for professionals, students and independent scholars. [...] The Heroic Age was founded in 1998. 
  2. ^ Ashley, Mike (2011-09-01). The Mammoth Book of King Arthur. Little, Brown Book Group. ISBN 9781780333557. The Heroic Age is a free on-line journal founded in 1998 and dedicated to the study of Northwestern Europe from the Late Roman Empire to the advent of the Norman Empire. 
  3. ^ "The Heroic Age Archives". www.heroicage.org. Retrieved 2015-12-17. 
  4. ^ Clarkson, Timothy (2012-10-05). "The Heroic Age (issue 15)". Senchus. Notes on Early Medieval Scotland. Retrieved 2015-12-17. This successful online journal, founded by Michelle Ziegler in the 1990s, goes from strength to strength. 
  5. ^ "Editorial Staff". www.heroicage.org. Retrieved 2015-12-20. The Heroic Age Founder: Michelle Ziegler (Belleville, Illinois), Interests: Sixth- to Ninth-century Northumbria and Dalriada, Hagiography 
  6. ^ "The Heroic Age Homepage". www.heroicage.org. Retrieved 2015-12-20. The Heroic Age focuses on Northwestern Europe during the early medieval period (from the early 4th through 13th centuries). 
  7. ^ a b "The Heroic Age Mission statement". www.heroicage.org. Retrieved 2015-12-15. The Heroic Age is dedicated to the exploration all aspects of early medieval Northwestern Europe, from a variety of vantage points and disciplines from the beginning of the fourth century through the beginning of the thirteenth. 
  8. ^ Jones, Charles (October 7, 2012). "AWOL - The Ancient World Online: Open Access Journal: The Heroic Age". ancientworldonline.blogspot.com. Retrieved 2015-12-20. The Heroic Age is dedicated to the exploration all aspects of early medieval Northwestern Europe, from a variety of vantage points and disciplines from the beginning of the fourth century through the beginning of the thirteenth. 
  9. ^ Liuzza, R.M., ed. (Spring 2007). "Call for Submissions: The Heroic Age Issue 13, "Early Medieval Manuscripts: Use and Abuse"" (PDF). Old English Newsletter. 40 (3). Published for The Old English Division of the Modern Language Association of America by The Department of English, University of Tennessee, Knoxville. p. 12. Retrieved 2015-12-15 – via OENewsletter.org. The Heroic Age is a fully peer-reviewed academic journal intended for professionals, students and independent scholars. Its focus is on Northwestern Europe during the early medieval period (from the late fourth through eleventh centuries). The editors seek to foster dialogue between all scholars of this period across ethnic and disciplinary boundaries, including, but not limited to, history, archaeology, and literature pertaining to the period. 
  10. ^ "The Heroic Age". Retrieved 2015-12-20. This is the blog of The Heroic Age, http://www.heroicage.org, an online journal dedicated to the study of European Northwest from 400-1100 AD. 
  11. ^ "Entry-20090508061914-_The_Heroic_Age - Scholares.net". www.scholares.net. Retrieved 2015-12-20. The Heroic Age: A Journal of Early Medieval Northwestern Europe invites submissions for our upcoming issues. In each issue, we plan to publish papers on any topic that falls approximately in the era between 300 and 1200 CE and within the general geographical region of Northwestern Europe [...]. 
  12. ^ Trinkle, Dennis A.; Merriman, Scott A. (2006). The History Highway: A 21st Century Guide to Internet Resources (4th ed.). M.E. Sharpe. p. 85. ISBN 9780765616302. The Heroic Age is a refereed online journal dedicated to the study of northwestern Europe from the late Roman empire to the advent of the Norman empire. 
  13. ^ "Letter from the Editor". www.heroicage.org. Retrieved 2016-01-04. 
  14. ^ "The Heroic Age Homepage". www.heroicage.org. Retrieved 2015-12-21. The Heroic Age publishes issues within the broad context of Early Medieval Northwestern Europe. 
  15. ^ "The Heroic Age Homepage". www.heroicage.org. Retrieved 2015-12-20. The Heroic Age focuses on Northwestern Europe during the early medieval period (from the early 4th through 13th centuries). We seek to foster dialogue between all scholars of this period across ethnic and disciplinary boundaries, including—but not limited to—history, archaeology, and literature pertaining to the period. 
  16. ^ "The Heroic Age Archives". www.heroicage.org. Retrieved 2015-12-21. 
  17. ^ Swain, Larry (May 2009). "Letter from the Editor". The Heroic Age. A Journal of Early Medieval Northwestern Europe (12). ISSN 1526-1867. Retrieved 2015-12-22. The Heroic Age will celebrate its first decade in 2010. We formed the board in late 1999 and published our inaugural issue in Spring 2000, imagined then as appearing quarterly. 
  18. ^ "The Heroic Age - A Journal of Early Medieval Northwestern Europe - Eintrag im Clio-online Web-Verzeichnis Geschichte". www.clio-online.de. Retrieved 2015-12-21. It is our intent to publish twice a year. 
  19. ^ Swain, Larry; Malcor, Linda (May 2008). "Letter from the Editor". The Heroic Age: A Journal of Early Medieval Northwestern Europe (11). ISSN 1526-1867. Retrieved 2015-12-22. [...] we are working on returning the journal to a bi-yearly schedule [...] 
  20. ^ Joy, Eileen A. "In the Middle: NEW ISSUE OF POSTMEDIEVAL: CRITICAL EXCHANGES". www.inthemedievalmiddle.com. Retrieved 2015-12-16. 
  21. ^ Joy, Eileen A. "The State(s) of Early English Studies: A Shared Essay Cluster with postmedieval: a journal of medieval cultural studies". www.heroicage.org. Retrieved 2015-12-20. The cluster of essays published jointly here and in Volume 1, Issue 3 of postmedieval: a journal of medieval cultural studies (Nov. 2010), addresses the intersections between early English studies, theory, and the present. 
  22. ^ Eden, Brad (2005). "Chapter 2. Humanities Web Portals". Library Technology Reports. Published by ALA TechSource, an imprint of the American Library Association (4, July–August 2005): 22. doi:10.5860/ltr.41n4. Retrieved 2015-12-20. A well-designed portal for this specific time period, The Heroic Age: Links Page features links to several categories, including Anglo-Saxon, Arthurian, Briton, Frankish, Irish, Norse, Scots and Picts, and Manx. 
  23. ^ "Editorial Staff". www.heroicage.org. Retrieved 2015-12-15. 
  24. ^ "thelonemedievalist". thelonemedievalist. Retrieved 2015-12-15. 

External links[edit]