Southwest Review

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Southwest Review  
Discipline literary journal
Language English
Edited by Greg Brownderville
Publication details
Former name(s)
Texas Review
Publication history
1915-present
Publisher
Frequency Quarterly
Standard abbreviations
Southwest Rev.
Indexing
ISSN 0038-4712
Links

The Southwest Review is a literary journal published quarterly, based on the Southern Methodist University campus in Dallas, Texas. It is the third oldest literary quarterly in the United States of America (US).[1] The current editor-in-chief is Greg Brownderville.

The journal was formerly known as the Texas Review, and was started in 1915[2] at the University of Texas. In 1924 the magazine was transferred to SMU by Jay B. Hubbell and George Bond, who served as joint editors until 1927.[3]

Famous contributors include: Quentin Bell, Amy Clampitt, Margaret Drabble, Natalia Ginzburg, James Merrill, Iris Murdoch, Howard Nemerov, Edmund White, Maxim Gorky, Cleanth Brooks, and Robert Penn Warren.

More recent contributors of note include: Ann Harleman, Thomas Beller, Ben Fountain, Gerald Duff, and Jacob M. Appel.

Willard Spiegelman, the editor of Southwest Review since 1984, received the PEN/Nora Magid Award for Magazine Editing in 2005.

Honors and awards[edit]

  • Ann Harleman's story, Meanwhile, received an O. Henry Award in 2003.
  • Ben Fountain's story, Fantasy for Eleven Fingers, won an O. Henry Award in 2005.
  • Barbara Moss Klein's story, Little Edens, was short-listed for the O. Henry Award in 2005.
  • Merritt Tierce's story, Suck It, was included in Best New Stories from the South 2008.
  • Jacob Appel's story, Rods and Cones, was short-listed for Best American Nonrequired Reading in 2008.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wedding 'Web' and Review, Dallas Morning News, October 23, 2000
  2. ^ "Top 50 Literary Magazine". EWR. Retrieved August 17, 2015. 
  3. ^ The Good Word About Dallas Area Literary Journals, Dallas Morning News, February 9, 1999.

External links[edit]