Tom Bevan

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Tom Bevan (1868–1938), who also wrote under the pseudonym Walter Bamfylde, was a British writer of boys' adventure stories.

Life[edit]

Born in Monmouthshire, Bevan was educated at Sir Thomas Rich's School and St. Paul's College, Cheltenham (a teacher training college awarding Bristol University qualifications). Working as a schoolmaster, he began writing historical adventure stories for boys. In the 1920s he was education editor for Sampson Low and Marston.[1]

Bevan wrote for several boys' magazines including Everybody's Story Magazine and Boy's Own Paper.[2]

Works[edit]

Books[edit]

  • (with E. Harcourt Burrage and John A. Higginson) White ivory and black : a tale of the Zambesi Basin : and other stories, London: S.W. Partridge & Co., 1899
  • The Thane of the Dean : a tale of the time of the Conqueror, London: S.W. Partridge & Co., 1899. With four illustrations by Lancelot Speed
  • Dick Dale, the colonial scout: a tale of the Transvaal War of 1899-1900, London: S.W. Partridge & Co., 1900. with eight illustration of Harold Piffard.
  • A lion of Wessex, or, How Saxon fought Dane, London : S. W. Partridge & Co., [1902]. With eight illustrations by Lancelot Speed.
  • Against the King, London; Glasgow: W. Collins, Sons & Co., [1903].
  • Red Dickon the outlaw : a story of mediaeval England, London: Nelson, 1904.
  • The war-god and the brown maiden / by Tom Bevan, London : Collins, [1904]. With eight illustrations by Warwick Goble.
  • A hero in wolf-skin : a story of pagan and Christian, London: Religious Tract Society, 1904. With illustrations by J. Finnemore.
  • Beggars of the sea. A story of the Dutch struggle with Spain, London: Thomas Nelson and Sons, [1904?].
  • A Trooper of the Finns. A tale of the Thirty Years' War, London : Religious Tract Society, 1905.
  • The Fen Robbers, London: T. Nelsno & Sons, 1906.
  • Held by Rebels, London, 1906. Illustrated by Percy Tarrant.
  • Beggars of the Sea: A Story of the Dutch struggle with Spain, London, 1906.
  • Sea-dogs all! A tale of forest and sea, London, 1907.
  • The Goldsmith of Chepe: A Tale of The Plague Year, London: The Religious Tract Society, 1908. With illustrations by J. Jellicoe. (Previously serialised in the Boys Own Paper, 1907.)
  • Runners of contraband: a story of Russian Tyranny, London, 1908. With illustrations by Wal Paget.
  • The "grey fox" of Holland: a tale of adventure during the insurrection against Philip II, London ; New York : T. Nelson and Sons, 1908.
  • The Chancellor's Spy. A vivid picture of life in the reign of Henry the Eighth, London: T. Nelson & Sons, 1909.
  • The insurgent trail: A story of the Balkans, London: Sir I. Pitman & Sons, 1910.
  • The Secret Men, London: S. W. Partridge & Co., 1910. With 6 illustrations by Ernest Prater.
  • Stories from British history (B.C. 54 - A.D. 1485), 1910

Stories[edit]

  • 'Young Asa - A Scouting Story', Oxford Annual For Scouts, [1920s?]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Benjamin Watson (1992). English Schoolboy Stories: An Annotated Bibliography of Hardcover Fiction. Scarecrow Press. p. 15. ISBN 978-0-8108-2572-7. 
  2. ^ Stanley Nichols, "Roving Thoughts on the 'B.O.P.'", Golden Hours 6:1 (December 1962), p. 81. For example, The Baymouth Scouts was serialised in the Boy's Own Paper in 1911–12. British Juvenile Story Papers and Pocket Libraries Index