User talk:Trust Is All You Need

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  1. Archive 1 (April – September 2009)
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"Candidate members"[edit]

Could you please explain to me where the practice of having "candidate" members originates from? Is it because during the Bolshevik revolution the members of these central bodies of the party had a chance of dying, so "candidates" were proposed to fill in these vacancies if the 'full' members died? Or was the intent from the beginning for candidate members to have a "voice at the table but no vote"? Colipon+(Talk) 16:58, 10 September 2015 (UTC)

@Colipon: Difficult question, but I'll try to answer as good as possible! .. The CC, and the party central bodies in general, worked different under Lenin and pre-lenin (in the original RSDLP).. The problem is two-fold, since by the late-1920s (early 1930s), CC membership became based on the slot system (similarly to the CPC today). CC candidates were members who had speaking rights at plenums, but could not vote. This was the original function, but why this came to be, I don't know.. Earlier in its history they also had a third category; prospective member. Unlike the CPC of today, being a candidate member seldom meant being transferred to full membership in the 1930s and later.
that's a very good question! Candidate members, interchangeably called non-voting members by writers on Soviet politics, were CC members who could not vote. But they were CC members. In the CPC, from what I can discern, alternate members are not members of the CC (has that always been the case?)... Why some were appointed candidates and some not in the early years I don't know; this is a problem with most studies on the USSR (interests in institutions as you and I understand them was popularised during the late-1980s, because of this studies on Soviet institutions have been neglected and forgotten)... In the beginning candidate membership entailed having a "voice at the table but no vote", but by the 1930s members in the CC was based upon the job-slot system (similar to the CPC today).. But its difficult to answer, Lenin's plan was to rule the Soviet Union through the post of head of government (Stalin ruled the the USSR as head of government from 1941 onwards, having vacated his post as general secretary in 1934). This is why several leading early Bolsheviks never became CC members during Lenin's time (the ministers were independent figures and didn't need CC membership; of course it would have been a +).. Its similar to PB meetings in the early period. When the PB was established, the CC complained it would turn the body into a second-tier institutions, it therefore requested that the PB regularly report to it and that every CC members had the right to participate and attend sessions of the PB (but CC members did not have voting rights during PB sessions; this practiced ended by the late-1920s)... However, with increased repression within its own rank the title of candidate lost its meaning (so from then on it was based on the job-slot system, as is currently practiced in the CPC today).. This is were the nomenklatura comes in.
Short answer: it originally meant a voice at the table but no vote, but this changed with increased repression within the party apparatus. By the 1930s you got shot by uttering the wrong word so what it was after that I don't know. Unlike in the CPC, the majority of CC members never became full members post-1940), but during party congresses (as during Gorbachev) it was the only way to refill the CC full category with new members. For instance, Gorby expelled several conseratives and replenished the CC in the meanwhile (waiting for the 28th Party Congress) by transferring CC candidate members to full membership status. But there was no ranking; the candidate member which the PB saw fit was transferred to full membership status (so it was entirely subjective, unlike in the CPC were you have a system in place). --TIAYN (talk) 21:15, 10 September 2015 (UTC)

Ranking[edit]

In your knowledge of the communist parties of the world, how prevalent is the practice of "ranking" members according to political clout? I assume the Soviet Union did this and that is where the CPC got it from? Just to be clear I am talking about the protocol rank order sequence of the top leaders of the party. Do all Communist states partake in this practice? Seems like Vietnam ranks their Politburo members based on votes received rather than by clout, and I am not sure about Cuba. China does this to an obsessive degree of course, and so does, it seems, North Korea.
On a separate note, the ranking (hierarchy) system of the civil service of the People's Republic of China is very elaborate, and it seems to be modeled not on typically "communist state" practices as much it is rooted in the ancient Chinese practice of ranking officials (they were divided into 9 grades, 18 sub-grades, historically). One does not find such a rigid ranking system in Cuba or the Soviet Union, or even North Korea! Colipon+(Talk) 17:03, 10 September 2015 (UTC)

@Colipon: In How the Soviet Union is Governed it is stated that, during the first congresses during the revolution (that is, pre-Stalin), "the number of votes received by each candidate was announced and a rank of popularity thereby revealed.".. But this stopped with Stalin.. Rank was still in use under Brezhnev, but as in the CPC today. For instance, the 23rd Congress listed members hierarchically, but during the 1970s (when Brezhnev was at his hight of his powers) his name was usually listed first, and the other remaining PB members were listed alphabetically (so B first and then he rest in alphabetical order)... While its true that the Vietnamese currently rank their PB members, you won't find anything about ranking in the CPV during the Vietnam War. Under Stalin members were listed in alphabetical order.. This is not to say that a ranking did not exist; it did, for instance during early-to-mid 1930s (before the purge) Kaganovich was the party's no. 2 as Second Secretary (but as I've mentioned before, the post was never formalised and no list stated that K was a no. 2)... But there was a formal rank; for instance, when Stalin died Georgy Malenkov was the presumptive heir since he was First Deputy Chairman of the Council of Ministers (Government First Deputy Prime Minister that is). Kosygin was formally no. 2 until he retired in 1980, but in reality he was not the no. 2 in the PB (Mikhail Suslov was). Another example, Stalin vacated hist post as general secretary in 1934, and was treated as first secretary (as in first-ranked).
The communist states did not have a civil service (at least how we define civil service), they had only bureaucracy. The gerontocracy which developed during the Brezhnev years happened because the Soviets (and the communists in general) did not understand institutions; the classical Marxist narrative gave little space to institutions and institution-building... For instance, Stalin since class struggle occurred under socialism (and would even increase during its early stage), institutions which safeguarded counter-revolutionaries (free-and-fair trails) could not be established if it went counter to the laws of history (institutions, in Soviet parlance simply called "laws", should always have the interest of the party in hand, since the party represented the class dictatorship). This idea developed under Lenin; law was means of repression, and law was supposed to be used by the state (the class dictatorship) to defend its own interests. Thats it... The institution-building which we see in China, Cuba, Laos and Vietnam today in areas such as the civil service, the rule by law el cetra have all been influenced/taken from the West. --TIAYN (talk) 21:15, 10 September 2015 (UTC)
But this seems to be an Asian thing. Its similar to ordering the number of CCs. No Eastern European Communist Party ever ordered the CC according to party congresses. Their was never a 5th CC in East Germany or a 23rd CC in the Soviet Union, but there was a 6th CC in North Korea (until they decided to stop holding party congresses), and is the case in Laos, Vietnam and China today. The ranking system seems too to be an Asian thing... The Cubans list the first and second secretary first (in Cuba the Second Secretary is a position which exists on paper, unlike its former Soviet counterpart) and the rest of the PB membership is listed in alphabetical order... In the USSR collective leadership meant in theory, that every leader PB member was equal (everyone of course knew that was not the case, but that was the ideal). .--TIAYN (talk) 21:15, 10 September 2015 (UTC)
Short answer; no (at least, not in the form as its practiced in China)


Sorry for the long answers, and sorry for the bad grammar (I'm tired). --TIAYN (talk) 21:15, 10 September 2015 (UTC)

I don't mind the long answers. What are your personal opinions about this 'ranking' feature of the Chinese system? Why is it necessary to do this, do you suppose? The politburo standing committee ranking is extremely strict protocol; all the news items on a given day have to follow this sequence; but what is perhaps even more surprising is that this rank order sequence convention stretches all the way down to the county level and even for the deputy heads at hospitals and schools! Colipon+(Talk) 12:23, 11 September 2015 (UTC)
@Colipon: I honestly can't tell you, however, I probably went too far. The Soviets did have a ranking system. But, as with much else, Western observers don't seem to be interested in the system in retrospect... For instance, see this... I also remembered incorrectly, Kosygin was no. 2 until 1971 (he was demoted to 1971 in response to conservative opposition to very, very light market reforms), and Podgorny took his place until 1977 when he was suddenly demoted and removed from the Politburo altogether. But here's the main difference I'd assume; Podgorny was simply removed, and very few historians dwell on its importance of P's ouster in retrospect (no one is interested in it in retrospect it seems), however if Xi would all of a sudden remove Li Keqiang the rumour mill would never stop... Of course, there are similarities. For instance, several sources say Wang Qishan is the real no. 2 in Chinese politics (Suslov was interchangeable no. 3–4, but always the real no. 2 in party organisation, serving as second secretary, in reality the top-ranked secretary since the general secretary rarely attended the meetings of the Secretariat).. I don't think there is such a big difference between the Soviet and the Chinese ranking system in theory... But there are some, for instance while the PB members were listed hierarchically at party congresses news bulletin would list it alphabetically with Brezhnev on top (this could never happen in China) and, more importantly, in China people can only sit for 10 years and have age limits. More importantly, the Soviet system was leader dominated (China is of course too), but in the CPSU Brezhnev (and his cronies) held separate meetings before the PB meetings to form a majority so that, for instance, Kosygin could not gain any backing for his reform initiatives—this explains why PB and Secretariat meetings only lasted for 30 minutes more or less... But of course, Kosygin was no. 2 1964–1969 (and on paper until 1971); the Glassboro Summit Conference is a perfect example, he visited the US before Brezhnev and met personally with the US president before Brezhnev... But Kosygin was never no. 2 within the party (but of course, that may also be the case for Li...) ... So while the ranking system was the same, it was, since Chinese politics is more formalised (and more importantly, there are term limits) the have different effects. But most importantly, in the Soviet Union the GenSec controlled personnel appointments by virtue of his position as GenSec and head of the Secretariat—in China, the GenSec is not a member of the Secretariat (this is power separation at its most basic, the same has been done in Laos and Vietnam, but not Cuba)... What Brezhnev did was no appoint new members to the Secretariat (he could by virtue as GenSec) and then somehow get these people into the PB (which he could on the basis of "circular flow of power"; e.g. that the GenSec had the power to appoint and dismiss provinical secretaries and the provincial secretaries decided de facto the delegates to the next party congress, adn the next party congress approved the GenSec's wishes).. What i'm trying to say is this; Soviet politics was more informalized, which explains why Kosygin as no. 3 was actively shielded from parts of the decision-making process by Brezhnev's clique who openly disagreed on his on matters regarding economic reform..) In China I doubt, but I don't know, that Xi's meets with three others before PSC meetings and then attends the meeting telling the other three members that the PSC has already reached a decision. The Chinese ranking system has more to do with reality. --TIAYN (talk) 22:20, 13 September 2015 (UTC)
Very interesting, thank you for the answer. The Chinese system is very interesting - at the national level, the chairs of the National People's Congress and the People's Consultative Conference (is this also a uniquely Chinese institution?) have also sat on the standing committee since 1992, though technically both of these positions are chiefly ceremonial in nature. It is notable that at the provincial level, People's Congress chairs are often one in the same as the party chief, and the local PCC chairman does not hold a seat on the provincial standing committee. Provincially standing committee members are supposedly ranked according to their date of entry into a provincial party standing committee, or if the date is the same, by the time at which they ascended to a sub-provincial level post. All deputy heads of departments or vice ministers are strictly ranked as well, partly based on their own experience, and partly based on the position they hold. Note that among Vice Premiers, Zhang Gaoli, by virtue of his PSC membership, is ranked first, while two-term Politburo member Liu Yandong is ranked second despite her portfolios being more 'junior' (sports, health, and so on). Wang Yang is also a one-term Politburo member with lower seniority than Liu, so he is ranked third, and Ma Kai is ranked last, since he entered the Politburo only in 2012. Colipon+(Talk) 16:49, 15 September 2015 (UTC)
The CPPCC is unique (I can't think of a similar institution; its strange that they don't formalise the institution.. I mean its formally an advisory body; if this is the case, why hasn't Jiang or Hu been appointed to it? Of course, the answer is obvious; they are too good for it. But I mean, the point of the CPPCC is to advise the leadership, and you would end or reduce the informalization of politics (and strengthen you're personal leadership) if you actual formalised it. Right? ... Interesting, very interesting... As for the FL review; I honestly can't find any information regarding individual CC plenums.. --TIAYN (talk) 22:03, 15 September 2015 (UTC)

Copy edit request for Vasily Anisimoff declined[edit]

I regret to inform you that your copy edit request for Vasily Anisimoff has been declined. See this conversation. – Jonesey95 (talk) 17:16, 15 September 2015 (UTC)

Alternative text on Star of David[edit]

Alternative text is meant only to tell a blind person what a sighted person would have seen. Since a sighted person would not see an explanation of the Star of David, a blind person does not need to be given one.

The other issue is that if the template appears 20 times on a page, the blind person will hear the alternate text 20 times. So if the alternate text had the long explanation, they would hear the explanation 20 times, which would be really annoying.

I'll add a documentation page to the Star of David template with a link to the Star of David Wikipedia page.

Thisisnotatest (talk) 21:10, 20 September 2015 (UTC)

I've set {{Star of David}} so the default is the short text, but that it can be overridden with other text, and I've used your text as the example for overriding. I've also overridden the alternate text with your text in the key symbol on Central Committee elected by the 16th Congress of the All-Union Communist Party (Bolsheviks). Finally, I'm looking for a way to automatically use the long form on first use on a page and the shorter version after that.

As for your question on the change log, other character symbols, such as {{double-dagger}} don't include a long description of the character, just the name of the character.

Thisisnotatest (talk) 21:51, 20 September 2015 (UTC)

@Thisisnotatest: OK. --TIAYN (talk) 22:01, 20 September 2015 (UTC)

== General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union You've gone beyond the 3RR rule, and I'll present that issue to the proper authorities about this issue. Urgup-tur (talk) 23:46, 22 September 2015 (UTC)

Chinese Civil War[edit]

I note that you reverted my edit of the duration of the Chinese Civil War, and assume it was in good faith. However, I cannot understand how anyone could think that a 10-year civil war ended in 1950. Even with pauses, which were honored in the breach as much as anything, the CCP-KMT conflict began in the Spring of 1927 with the Shanghai Massacre, and ended in 1950, when the last of the Nationalist troops were chased into Burma. That's more than 27 years. DOR (HK) (talk) 04:49, 20 October 2015 (UTC)

@DOR (HK): This is what the Chinese Civil War article says (in the infobox); "Date 1 August 1927[1] – 22 December 1936[2] (9 years, 4 months and 3 weeks) [and] 31 March 1946 – 1 May 1950 (4 years and 1 month)".. So according to that article, we are both wrong; it lasted for 13 years... Its difficult to say when it ended and when it started since no armistic treaty has ever been signed, and it had several "pause" moments in which the central KMT and PLA never attacked each other. --TIAYN (talk) 11:25, 20 October 2015 (UTC)
All that means is that the Chinese Civil War article is wrong. Consider this from Chinese_Civil_War#Communist_insurgency,
"The situation came to a head in late 1940 and early 1941 when clashes between Communist and KMT forces intensified. In December 1940 Chiang demanded that the CPC’s New Fourth Army evacuate Anhui and Jiangsu Provinces due to its provocation and harassment of KMT forces in this area. Under intense pressure, the New Fourth Army commanders complied. In 1941 they were ambushed by KMT forces during their evacuation, which led to several thousand deaths.[38] It also ended the Second United Front, which had been formed earlier to fight the Japanese.[38]"

and,

" In 1941 the Soviet Union, with its closer alliance to the CPC, also sent an imperative telegram to Mao warning that the civil war would also make the situation easier for the Japanese military. Due to the international community's efforts, there was a temporary and superficial peace."

finally,

"The first post-war peace negotiation was attended by both Chiang Kai-shek and Mao Zedong in Chongqing from 28 August 1945 and concluded on 10 October 1945 with the signing of Double Tenth Agreement.[42]"

DOR (HK) (talk) 02:34, 21 October 2015 (UTC)

WikiProject X Newsletter • Issue 5[edit]

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Newsletter • October 2015

Hello there! Happy to be writing this newsletter once more. This month:

We did it!

In July, we launched five pilot WikiProjects: WikiProjects Cannabis, Evolutionary Biology, Ghana, Hampshire, and Women's Health. We also use the new design, named "WPX UI," on WikiProject Women in Technology, Women in Red, WikiProject Occupational Safety and Health. We are currently looking for projects for the next round of testing. If you are interested, please sign up on the Pilots page.

Shortly after our launch we presented at Wikimania 2015. Our slides are on Wikimedia Commons.

Then after all that work, we went through the process of figuring out whether we accomplished our goal. We reached out to participants on the redesigned WikiProjects, and we asked them to complete a survey. (If you filled out your survey—thank you!) While there are still some issues with the WikiProject tools and the new design, there appears to be general satisfaction (at least among those who responded). The results of the survey and more are documented in our grant report filed with the Wikimedia Foundation.

The work continues!

There is more work that needs to be done, so we have applied for a renewal of our grant. Comments on the proposal are welcome. We would like to improve what we have already started on the English Wikipedia and to also expand to Wikimedia Commons and Wikidata. Why those? Because they are multilingual projects and because there needs to be better coordination across Wikimedia projects. More details are available in the renewal proposal.

How can the Wikimedia Foundation support WikiProjects?

The Wikimedia Developer Summit will be held in San Francisco in January 2016. The recently established Community Tech team at the Wikimedia Foundation is interested in investigating what technical support they can provide for WikiProjects, i.e., support beyond just templates and bots. I have plenty of opinions myself, but I want to hear what you think. The session is being planned on Phabricator, the Wikimedia bug tracker. If you are not familiar with Phabricator, you can log in with your Wikipedia username and password through the "Login or Register: MediaWiki" button on the login page. Your feedback can help make editing Wikipedia a better experience.


Until next time,

Harej (talk) 09:03, 26 October 2015 (UTC)

Leader theory listed at Redirects for discussion[edit]

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An editor has asked for a discussion to address the redirect Leader theory. Since you had some involvement with the Leader theory redirect, you might want to participate in the redirect discussion if you have not already done so. BDD (talk) 04:16, 21 November 2015 (UTC)

ArbCom elections are now open![edit]

Hi,
You appear to be eligible to vote in the current Arbitration Committee election. The Arbitration Committee is the panel of editors responsible for conducting the Wikipedia arbitration process. It has the authority to enact binding solutions for disputes between editors, primarily related to serious behavioural issues that the community has been unable to resolve. This includes the ability to impose site bans, topic bans, editing restrictions, and other measures needed to maintain our editing environment. The arbitration policy describes the Committee's roles and responsibilities in greater detail. If you wish to participate, you are welcome to review the candidates' statements and submit your choices on the voting page. For the Election committee, MediaWiki message delivery (talk) 14:05, 24 November 2015 (UTC)

ArbCom elections are now open![edit]

Hi,
You appear to be eligible to vote in the current Arbitration Committee election. The Arbitration Committee is the panel of editors responsible for conducting the Wikipedia arbitration process. It has the authority to enact binding solutions for disputes between editors, primarily related to serious behavioural issues that the community has been unable to resolve. This includes the ability to impose site bans, topic bans, editing restrictions, and other measures needed to maintain our editing environment. The arbitration policy describes the Committee's roles and responsibilities in greater detail. If you wish to participate, you are welcome to review the candidates' statements and submit your choices on the voting page. For the Election committee, MediaWiki message delivery (talk) 14:09, 24 November 2015 (UTC)

Source, please[edit]

In the Communist Party of China page, you added "and International Communist Seminar" to the CCP's international affiliations, without citing a source. Would you please provide a source, so that the reference is not inadvertently deleted? Thanks. DOR (HK) (talk) 11:26, 20 December 2015 (UTC)

@DOR (HK): Do I really need to? International Meeting of Communist and Workers' Parties is not referenced... I don't know if it attended the latest conference, but it attended the one in 2013 and 2009. The party semi-regularly attends. --TIAYN (talk) 19:35, 20 December 2015 (UTC)
The reason I raised the issue is that after many decades of closely studying CCP history, this is the first I've ever seen of that particular phrasing ("Seminar"). Is there another, perhaps more common term? DOR (HK) (talk) 09:45, 24 December 2015 (UTC)

@DOR (HK): here... The Chinese name is 国际共产主义研讨会 (it has its own Wikipedia page). --TIAYN (talk) 23:59, 24 December 2015 (UTC)

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Nomination of Wisconsin Green Party for deletion[edit]

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Nomination of Green Party of New Jersey for deletion[edit]

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X-Files Mythology Edit War[edit]

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WikiProject X Newsletter • Issue 6[edit]

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Newsletter • January 2016

Hello there! Happy to be writing this newsletter once more. This month:

What comes next

Some good news: the Wikimedia Foundation has renewed WikiProject X. This means we can continue focusing on making WikiProjects better.

During our first round of work, we created a prototype WikiProject based on two ideas: (1) WikiProjects should clearly present things for people to do, and (2) The content of WikiProjects should be automated as much as possible. We launched pilots, and for the most part it works. But this approach will not work for the long term. While it makes certain aspects of running a WikiProject easier, it makes the maintenance aspects harder.

We are working on a major overhaul that will address these issues. New features will include:

  • Creating WikiProjects by simply filling out a form, choosing which reports you want to generate for your project. This will work with existing bots in addition to the Reports Bot reports. (Of course, you can also have sections curated by humans.)
  • One-click button to join a WikiProject, with optional notifications.
  • Be able to define your WikiProject's scope within the WikiProject itself by listing relevant pages and categories, eliminating the need to tag every talk page with a banner. (You will still be allowed to do that, of course. It just won't be required.)

The end goal is a collaboration tool that can be used by WikiProjects but also by any edit-a-thon or group of people that want to coordinate on improving articles. Though implemented as an extension, the underlying content will be wikitext, meaning that you can continue to use categories, templates, and other features as you normally would.

This will take a lot of work, and we are just getting started. What would you like to see? I invite you to discuss on our talk page.


Until next time,

Harej (talk) 02:53, 20 January 2016 (UTC)

TFL notification[edit]

Hi, TIAYN. I'm just posting to let you know that 22nd Presidium of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union – a list that you have been heavily involved with – has been chosen to appear on the Main Page as Today's featured list for February 22. The TFL blurb can be seen here. If you have any thoughts on the selection, please post them on my talk page or at TFL talk. Regards, Giants2008 (Talk) 18:20, 25 January 2016 (UTC)

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File:John Lyng.jpg listed for discussion[edit]

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WikiProject X Newsletter • Issue 7[edit]

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Newsletter • February 2016

This month:

One database for Wikipedia requests

Development of the extension for setting up WikiProjects, as described in the last issue of this newsletter, is currently underway. No terribly exciting news on this front.

In the meantime, we are working on a prototype for a new service we hope to announce soon. The problem: there are requests scattered all across Wikipedia, including requests for new articles and requests for improvements to existing articles. We Wikipedians are very good at coming up with lists of things to do. But once we write these lists, where do they end up? How can we make them useful for all editors—even those who do not browse the missing articles lists, or the particular WikiProjects that have lists?

Introducing Wikipedia Requests, a new tool to centralize the various lists of requests around Wikipedia. Requests will be tagged by category and WikiProject, making it easier to find requests based on what your interests are. Accompanying this service will be a bot that will let you generate reports from this database on any wiki page, including WikiProjects. This means that once a request is filed centrally, it can syndicated all throughout Wikipedia, and once it is fulfilled, it will be marked as "complete" throughout Wikipedia. The idea for this service came about when I saw that it was easy to put together to-do lists based on database queries, but it was harder to do this for human-generated requests when those requests are scattered throughout the wiki, siloed throughout several pages. This should especially be useful for WikiProjects that have overlapping interests.

The newsletter this month is fairly brief; not a lot of news, just checking in to say that we are hard at work and hope to have more for you soon.

Until next time,

Harej (talk) 01:44, 24 February 2016 (UTC)

Current communist rulers listed at Redirects for discussion[edit]

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An editor has asked for a discussion to address the redirect Current communist rulers. Since you had some involvement with the Current communist rulers redirect, you might want to participate in the redirect discussion if you have not already done so. Steel1943 (talk) 19:54, 5 April 2016 (UTC)

WikiProject X Newsletter • Issue 8[edit]

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Newsletter • March / April 2016

This month:

Transclude article requests anywhere on Wikipedia

In the last issue of the WikiProject X Newsletter, I discussed the upcoming Wikipedia Requests system: a central database for outstanding work on Wikipedia. I am pleased to announce Wikipedia Requests is live! Its purpose is to supplement automatically generated lists, such as those from SuggestBot, Reports bot, or Wikidata. It is currently being demonstrated on WikiProject Occupational Safety and Health (which I work on as part of my NIOSH duties) and WikiProject Women scientists.

Adding a request is as simple as filling out a form. Just go to the Add form to add your request. Adding sources will help ensure that your request is fulfilled more quickly. And when a request is fulfilled, simply click "mark as complete" and it will be removed from all the lists it's on. All at the click of a button! (If anyone is concerned, all actions are logged.)

With this new service is a template to transclude these requests: {{Wikipedia Requests}}. It's simple to use: add the template to a page, specifying article=, category=, or wikiproject=, and the list will be transcluded. For example, for requests having to do with all living people, just do {{Wikipedia Requests|category=Living people}}. Use these lists on WikiProjects but also for edit-a-thons where you want a convenient list of things to do on hand. Give it a shot!

Help us build our list!

The value of Wikipedia Requests comes from being a centralized database. The long work to migrating individual lists into this combined list is slowly underway. As of writing, we have 883 open tasks logged in Wikipedia Requests. We need your help building this list.

If you know of a list of missing articles, or of outstanding tasks for existing articles, that you would like to migrate to this new system, head on over to Wikipedia:Wikipedia Requests#Transition project and help out. Doing this will help put your list in front of more eyes—more than just your own WikiProject.

An open database means new tools

WikiProject X maintains a database that associates article talk pages (and draft talk pages) with WikiProjects. This database powers many of the reports that Reports bot generates. However, until very recently, this database was not made available to others who might find its data useful. It's only common sense to open up the database and let others build tools with it.

And indeed: Citation Hunt, the game to add citations to Wikipedia, now lets you filter by WikiProject, using the data from our database.

Are you a tool developer interested in using this? Here are some details: the database resides on Tool Labs with the name s52475__wpx_p. The table that associates WikiProjects with articles and drafts is called projectindex. Pages are stored by talk page title but in the future this should change. Have fun!

On the horizon
  • The work on the CollaborationKit extension continues. The extension will initially focus on reducing template and Lua bloat on WikiProjects (especially our WPX UI demonstration projects), and will from there create custom interfaces for creating and maintaining WikiProjects.
  • The WikiCite meeting will be in Berlin in May. The goal of the meeting is to figure out how to build a bibliographic database for use on the Wikimedia projects. This fits in quite nicely with WikiProject X's work: we want to make it easier for people to find things to work on, and with a powerful, open bibliographic database, we can build recommendations for sources. This feature was requested by the Wikipedia Library back in September, and this meeting is a major next step. We look forward to seeing what comes out of this meeting.


Until next time,

Harej (talk) 01:29, 20 April 2016 (UTC)

Disruptive editing[edit]

Warning icon Please stop your disruptive editing. If you continue to blank out or remove portions of page content, templates, or other materials from Wikipedia, as you did at Authoritarian socialism, you may be blocked from editing. This is not the first time I have witnessed your brilliant attempts to hide your sneaky vandalism by replacing pages with redirects. WP:SNEAKY. I will be now checking and monitoring your edit history for similar incidents. Ceosad (talk) 23:31, 6 May 2016 (UTC)

@Ceosad: you got it wrong on both accounts.. Secondly, authoritarian socialism is not a scholar topic. It's a fantasy topic. None of the scholars in that article uses the term "authoritarian socialism", and if they do, they are referring to Marxism-Leninism, Maoism, Juche el cetra. Use you're brains :) --TIAYN (talk) 08:08, 7 May 2016 (UTC)
@Trust Is All You Need: In any case, just bring the Authoritarian socialism page to WP:AFD instead, if you really have to see it gone. Page blanking is not deletion. I have reverted the newest blanking of the article. Ceosad (talk) 00:10, 8 May 2016 (UTC)

WPK Central Auditing Commission[edit]

Does this group actually do anything, to your knowledge? Also where do you get your information on WPK organization? Seems like an awfully obscure topic, even for academics. Colipon+(Talk) 20:18, 11 May 2016 (UTC)

(talk page stalker) According to the Charter (1980), they "audit the finances and accounting work of the party".[1] In essence, they're the statutory auditor who are nominated directly by, and report to, the Congress/Conference. The Chairman, Auditing Commission and the Central Committee (CC) are the only ones elected by the Congress/Conference, everyone else is elected by the CC. As such, the Auditing Commission is independent of the CC, which it audits. (They audit "the party", but since all other party organs are elected by the CC, in practice that's whom they audit). Obscure yes, but I hope we can have an article for this. – Finnusertop (talkcontribs) 20:47, 11 May 2016 (UTC)
@Colipon and Finnusertop: See Central Auditing Commission of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union... Simply put, it audits the party's finances. Nothing more, the WPK also have a Control Commission (which disciplines organs and cadres below the CC level)..
Its an important institution in all party-states, but its been barely analysed at all by academics (I'm now talking about all of them, the CAC in the USSR, in East Germany or the present-day one in the WPK..) ... Its seems to have garnered extremely little attention... ,as the 7th Congress made very clear; no one should disobey the leader, everyone should follow the leader's will and everyone should support and struggle the monolithic ideology and leadership of the WPK... What I'm trying to say, is this; those it really matter? It's North Korea. The only thing they've formalised is the leader principle, everything else is secondary. ... If you find any interesting topics on the CAC, please tell me! --TIAYN (talk) 21:24, 11 May 2016 (UTC)
So what is your take on the 7th WPK Congress? Is it possible that Kim Jong Un is attempting to check the military by strengthening the party? Why did Kim Jong Il choose to host a "conference" instead of a "congress"? Colipon+(Talk) 15:42, 12 May 2016 (UTC)
Colipon (talk · contribs) Honestly, I don't know. But everything in North Korea has to be grandiose, so convening the first congress in 36-years creates interest.... Some people write that he did it to legitimise his rule - formally the congress has to elect him leader of the party - but I doubt so. It never did Kim Jong-il any harm not doing it... Maybe its his way of saying he's bringing the party back in, but I doubt so... What I think is the following, Kim Il-sung convened party congresses, so Kim Jong-un does the same. Kim Il-sung is like George Washington, they love him down there simply because... why shouldn't they? It was better under him than under Kim Jong-il.As Michael Madden puts it; "North Korea is a patriarchal culture, but in a totalitarian system, being able to wield power as gatekeepers or financial functionaries is more powerful than sitting on a political bureau, you have realistic powers day-to-day"...
I used to think North Korea could change, but how could it? I mean, if they open up aren't the North Korean people bound to ask why it is the only socialist country which operates a hereditary dictatorship. Why its the only socialist country that doesn't bother to hold congresses... Or why the Great Leader, who officially never makes mistakes, needed to introduce market reforms in the first place? If they do anything, their system will collapse. --TIAYN (talk) 16:32, 13 May 2016 (UTC)

North Korea working group[edit]

Flag of North Korea.svg You are invited to participate in the North Korea working group of WikiProject Korea, a workgroup dedicated to developing and improving articles about North Korea.

– Finnusertop (talkcontribs) 07:39, 12 May 2016 (UTC)

Orphaned non-free image File:Logo of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, Shenin.jpg.png[edit]

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Fastest serve listed at Redirects for discussion[edit]

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An editor has asked for a discussion to address the redirect Fastest serve. Since you had some involvement with the Fastest serve redirect, you might want to participate in the redirect discussion if you have not already done so. Steel1943 (talk) 22:04, 2 June 2016 (UTC)

Disambiguation link notification for June 18[edit]

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WikiProject X Newsletter • Issue 9[edit]

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Newsletter • May / June 2016

Check out this month's issue of the WikiProject X newsletter, featuring the first screenshot of our new CollaborationKit software!

Harej (talk) 00:23, 25 June 2016 (UTC)

File:Flag of the Lao People's Revolutionary Party.png listed for discussion[edit]

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A file that you uploaded or altered, File:Flag of the Lao People's Revolutionary Party.png, has been listed at Wikipedia:Files for discussion. Please see the discussion to see why it has been listed (you may have to search for the title of the image to find its entry). Feel free to add your opinion on the matter below the nomination. Thank you. Stefan2 (talk) 09:26, 11 July 2016 (UTC)

Orphaned non-free image File:Oscar Torp.jpg[edit]

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Note that any non-free images not used in any articles will be deleted after seven days, as described in the criteria for speedy deletion. Thank you. Sfan00 IMG (talk) 11:08, 27 July 2016 (UTC)